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What should I study if I want to become a lawyer?

I am about to graduate from his school and I am still unsure of what career path I want to follow #professor #law #lawyer #student #attorney #pre-law

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Subject: Career question for you

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Jane’s Answer

If you're interested in becoming a lawyer, you'll need to attend law school and obtain a law degree, typically a Juris Doctor (J.D.). Before applying to law school, it's helpful to gain a strong foundation in a variety of subjects, including English, history, political science, economics, and philosophy, among others. This will help you develop critical thinking, reading comprehension, and writing skills, all of which are essential for success in law school and in a legal career.

During law school, you'll study a wide range of legal subjects, including constitutional law, contracts, criminal law, property law, and torts, among others. You'll also have opportunities to participate in practical legal experience, such as moot court or clinical programs, to gain hands-on experience in the field.

In addition to your formal education, it's also important to develop a strong network of professional contacts, by participating in legal organizations, attending legal events, and building relationships with lawyers and other legal professionals in your community. This will help you gain exposure to different areas of the law and learn about job opportunities as you begin your legal career.
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Kim’s Answer

Verona,
Hi! Let me try to answer this and some other questions you have posed, since I too, live in San Antonio!




  1. Avoiding debt: Join the military, and save for your education. It is even possible to get them to send you to law school, but the competition is fierce and you have to agree to stay in for x number of years afterwards. Or get a job, ANY job, someplace with a good tuition reimbursement program. Some of the schools even offer free tuition, I think, if you work there. Look into Admin Asst, police dispatcher, etc at Trinity. Other companies offer tuition reimbursement. Perhaps Valero, HEB, hospitals, etc. This will slow you down though, as it is difficult to work full time, go to school full time, and get the required good grades. Also consider junior college for the first year and a half or two. And definitely don't go to a private school unless someone else is paying for it. It's good that you are being realistic about expenses and debt!




  2. Best law schools: Research the percentage of graduates who pass the bar, and how many are employed in law. Please realize, law schools are cranking out a lot more graduates than are getting hired. The market is saturated. It is difficult to get a decent paying job to allow you to pay back your law school loans. St. Mary's does not have a super great track record, but has produced some good lawyers!




  3. classes to take: Start by thinking about what you will want to be doing if you are NOT a lawyer. Any major will get you into law school. After that, I'd recommend Latin, Logic, writing, speaking, debate, any class that teaches compromise and negotiation. Everything you can do to stay current with technology, esp. Adobe Pro (most courts require e-filing of documents). Challenge yourself, challenge your self-confidence, as lawyering is tough! Some basic accounting, Business Organizations, Spanish. I don't know if UTSA still has it, but they used to have a Moot Court class. If you go to SAC, take the Intro Paralegal class with Prof. Schoolcraft. (the other profs are too easy!) I was not overly impressed with the program, but at least that one class will give you an intro to law.




As to me: I'm a retired cop, work freelance for an atty doing criminal defense (mostly for people facing a risk of deportation), employment law, and civil rights (excessive force, in-custody deaths, etc). It is a hobby, so it is not as stressful as working full time. I love it! I work fulltime doing job placement, and have had a few unemployed lawyers as my clients. Some of them had jobs, but decided to give up being a lawyer because they did not like it.


Hope this has been of some help! Good luck to you!

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Richard’s Answer

I would choose a major that interests you! You will learn about career opportunities in college. I am a physician and have always loved math and science. My wife is an attorney. She prefers reading and writing. She had students in her school from every major imaginable. If you love science, you could do that and then do medical malpractice. If you love accounting, you could become a tax attorney. Law schools don’t require a certain field of study. My wife chose history, and said that all the essay writing in college came in handy for writing in law school.
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