8 answers
Asked Viewed 139 times Translate

How many classes are necessary to go to college?

What classes are needed for colleges and jobs?
#college #jobs #classes #work


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
11
100% of 9 Pros
100% of 2 Students

8 answers


Updated Translate

John’s Answer

Angela college is an important investment in your future. The amount of time and effort you spend preparing for college can ease the transition and help you get more out of the experience. From proper time management to taking better notes, there are a few things you can work on while you are still in high school to prepare for the demands of college. As a high school student, you may be evaluating which college you would like to attend after you graduate. While making a decision about where to go is vital to how your college experience will play out, there are many things that you can be doing to prepare for college in the meantime. Developing good habits in high school will lead to good habits in college, and while a college degree is something that pays off, being properly equipped to handle university-level classes prior to entering college will contribute largely to the enjoyment you receive while studying at a university.

When colleges calculate your GPA for admissions purposes, they will often ignore the GPA on your transcript and focus solely on your grades in these core subject areas. Grades for physical education, music ensembles, and other non-core courses are not as useful for predicting your level of college readiness as these core courses. This doesn't mean that electives aren't important, as colleges do want to see that you have a breadth of interests and experiences, but they simply don't provide a good window into an applicant's ability to handle rigorous college courses. Core course requirements vary from state to state, and many of the more selective colleges will want to see a strong high school academic record that goes well beyond the core. Advanced Placement, IB, and Honors courses are a must to be competitive at the most selective colleges. In most cases, the strongest applicants to highly selective colleges will have four years of math (including calculus), four years of science, and four years of a foreign language. If your high school doesn't offer advanced language courses or calculus, the admissions folks will typically learn this from your counselor's report, and this won't be held against you. The admissions folks want to see that you have taken the most challenging courses available to you. High schools vary significantly in the types of challenging courses they can provide.

Hope this was helpful Angela

John recommends the following next steps:

The first thing that you need to do is work with your high school counsellor. This person will be supporting you over the next year and they may also ask you about your career plans.
Internships will give you a glimpse into a potential career path, and they might even help you with your professional future. When you walk away from your internship, you will have a much better understanding of the realities of the industry.

Thank You Angela. There is no royal road to anything. One thing at a time, all things in succession. That which grows fast, withers as rapidly. That which grows slowly, endures. John Frick

Thank You Miguel. “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good. ” – Ivan Scheier John Frick

3
100% of 2 Pros
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Ashley’s Answer

To go to college you just need to finish High School or get GED. You may end up having to take classes that dont count towards your degree if you didnt take them in Highschool, called pre-requisites. This may be something like Calculus 1 for an engineering degree, or you can test out.

One you get to college it depends on the degree but for an associates it is 2 years of classes and a bachelore it is 4, assuming full time. Ususally you take about 4-5 classes a semester which is 12-16 credit hour. Colleges talk in credit hours, which usually corresponds to the hours you are in class each week. This seems low, 15 hours per week in class seems easy, but this doenst could any homework or labs. Full time school is a full time job.

Trade schools are very different and that really depends on what you do.

2
100% of 1 Pros
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Angela! Different career choices mean different majors so you take different classes in college based on your major. For example if you are a Psychology major you will take core classes for Psychology like Experimental, Research, Statistics, as well as electives in the area of Psychology you are interested in. For college you usually need a high school diploma to apply. Most of the classes that students take before college are common English, math, science, etc. There could be some difference like some students take a language all through their 4 years of high school or taking AP classes if they are interested in the sciences like AP Biology or AP Chemistry. You also need to take the SATs as well.
I hope this helps and please let me know if you have more questions!
Best of luck!

1
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Miguel’s Answer

Hello Angela, If you are interested in pursing a college education you want to first graduate from high school or complete your GED. If you are in high school and enroll in advanced placement courses (i.e. AP classes) the credit from those classes can count as college credit. Also, depending on the kind of college education you are interested in (i.e. traditional, nursing, vocational, etc.) you want to ensure that you fulfill any prerequisite courses and take any necessary entry exams before applying to college. Like stated in a previous post please do get in contact with a high school counselor that can help you with choosing a school, completing requirements, and financial aid.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Maya’s Answer

Hi Angela! In short, you necessarily need a specific amount of classes but certain kinds of classes. The best way to make sure you are taking all those necessary classes to go to college and graduate high school speak with your high school counselor to make sure you are on track. Hope this helped!

0
Updated Translate

Kiirsten’s Answer

Hi Angela!

Great question, wonderful for you that you're mentally preparing for your future! In terms of your question, the other professionals had some great answers. I personally did dual enrollment in high school so that helped with some of my general education credits that I would have taken at my college. For the most part, no matter where you go, the first two years of courses are what are called "general education" courses, many of them are "intro to ___" and are offered at community college at great rates. If you are asking the question because you are a little tight financially, I highly recommend that you attend community college for the first two years--- you will end up saving thousands of dollars on your general education classes, then you can transfer to a university! If you're asking the question to just get admitted to a college, high school/GED is a requirement for admittance, the higher your high school GPA, the more competitive you'll look and will help your chances of being admitted into college-- this is also mixed with your SAT scores, volunteer hours (for some schools), and extra-curriculars. I recommend that you speak with your guidance counselor on next steps to help you create a plan of action.

Good luck!

0
Updated Translate

Gloria’s Answer

Hi Angela,

I am not quite sure that I understand your question. College admittance usually requires that you graduate from high school based on the rules of the state where you live. If you are still in high school, I would say that you should take a variety of classes, especially if you know what you want to study in college. Also, if you can earn college credit while you are in high school, I would recommend that you do it. My niece earned college credit while she was in high school and that saved her and her family a lot of money when she went to college.

Gloria

0
Updated Translate

Ziana’s Answer

Hello Angela,

This is a great question, with most Universities for pursuing a Bachelors of Science degree which usually will take 8 semesters, 4 years in total you will need at least 120 credit hours. This will be including your basic courses reading, writing, math, etc... I personally started off slowly with my credit hours. Starting with 12 hours, 4 courses in total, as time progressed I gradually increased my courses. It is whatever you are most comfortable doing, but you don’t want to overwhelm yourself with courses & give yourself a big workload when you are first starting. I hope this helps, & I wish you the best of luck!

0