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What should I study with my major?

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I'm a freshman in college and am not sure what to study alongside my current major of International Business. I am not certain if I want to go with a double major with finance or accounting and a minor in psychology or the opposite. I know I have time to decide what I need to study but I want to know what professionals think I should study. #psychology #finance #accounting #international-business

Nobody should think what you study. There aren't any professionals who can decide that for you. You're a freshman. It might not occur to you right now what you really want to do but it will soon. Just take the first two years and take the classes that are required as general education but also considering taking different courses as electives and usually that helps with what you want to major in. Anum T. Translate
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Shante’s Answer

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Miles -


I agree studying a language as a minor with International Business would have your path to success greater when you come out of school, but if you are not sure of what you should study, think about the topics that interest you. Look at what jobs salaries are and if that is a factor than look deeper to make a decision what you would like to do.


Goodluck!

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Linda Ann’s Answer

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If you aren't fluent in a foreign language, I would recommend a language minor . It would provide you with a competitive advantage when job hunting!


Good luck with your studies.

I am fluent in a second language already. I'm a dual citizen of the United States and South Africa. Miles F. Translate
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Michael’s Answer

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Hi Miles,


I'd like to focus on the benefits of a general education as it relates to the college experience.


When I started my college education, I'd been given advice by friends and family that I would be more marketable if I pursued a more general education than focusing on, say, a business degree.  I opted for Communications, and quickly discovered that it wasn't for me. I transferred to a community college, and got my Associate's in Liberal Arts.  This experience provided me with a solid foundation, and gave me the opportunity to figure out what I wanted to do. I transferred to a 4-year school, where I majored in English. Because I'd completed virtually all of my '101' foundational courses, I was able to immerse myself in my major for the next 2 years - and I didn't lose any credits when I transferred. 


I know plenty of people who enrolled in college thinking they knew exactly what career they wanted to pursue, only to change majors halfway through. In some cases, they made radical changes (e.g. switching from Early Childhood Education to Information Technology), and lost a semester or more of credits because most of their classes could only be applied to electives.  So, for new college students, I would strongly recommend starting out with a broad, general education.


Obviously, there is no "right" answer. I've spent 21 years working in IT, and I was an English major (and finally completed my BA in Liberal Arts in 2016.)  I've been asked on multiple interviews why "someone with my background" would want to work in tech.  It's a reasonable question, but here's the thing: I've always been a bit of a technology geek, even though I consider myself to be firmly grounded in the Humanities.   It took a bit of convincing and a hiring manager who decided to give me a chance, but I got the job. As Danielle noted: find what drives you. Not only will you be happier in your education & your career, but that passion will come through when you're sitting across from a prospective employer.


Best of luck.


//mike

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Danelle’s Answer

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Hi Miles,


When deciding on my major/minor, I decided on Accounting as my major because I picked it up quickly. I also factored in that I'd be able to have a stable income and career opportunities. I also wanted to travel and see the world and thought that industry would provide me with opportunities.


For my major, I'm the type of person that likes to continuously learn and am interested in a broad spectrum. Because of this, I decided on Marketing. I felt having one highly technical business emphasis paired with a "people" minor would make me a more well-rounded professional.


I would first suggest trying to figure out what you enjoy doing. From there, decide whether you want something stable, competitive, etc. I hope this all helps!


Best of luck!

Danelle recommends the following next steps:

  • Take an inventory of what drives you.
  • Evaluate your career goals.
  • Research, perspective and more research! Knowledge is power after all.
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