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How do you see meritocracy inside a company?

I am searching for an interniship, but I am seeing that sometimes people get a job easier when there is someone inside the conpany that rely on them, that has been indicated by someone else. But is it a problem for meritrocacy? I say, a person that does not have someone inside the company to indicate him. business management civil-engineering administration industrial-engineering executive-office

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Michael’s Answer

You've just experienced the value of "networking". Networking can be knowing someone in the company to give your application a positive nudge because he/she knows you or a friend or acquaintance that can vouch for you that you are a good, hard working person. There's nothing wrong with this in most circumstances, in my opinion. If you know you are competing for a position/internship with someone that has an upper edge, it can be tough. You need to be noticed, make a good impression, try again next year, or sometimes look elsewhere when the time is right. I've never heard the term, Meritocracy. I assume to understand, though. Making a good impression is always a challenge. Grades are not as important as personal drive to learn, be active is extracurricular activities (I'm speaking in terms of my degree, engineering). Staying curious, and learning outside of class is a valuable part of your resume/experience.

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Nathalie’s Answer

Increasingly so companies are actively fighting biases but they also encourage employees (and often reward) to refer candidates.

Knowing someone at a company helps the company on two fronts even if the person who introduces you to the hiring company is not part of the hiring process (often enforced at companies): 1) you have been 'sourced', you are a candidate and 2) the company has more information about you because someone knows you. You have a leg up because you can get more information about the culture of the company, the job, etc...even before interviewing. Knowledge is power.

?Neither of those will guarantee that you will be hired and both of those can be achieved through different means - this happens to be an efficient one. At the end of the day, when companies are looking to hire someone, they are successful when they have someone in the job. It is in the interest of the hiring manager to field as many candidates as possible. Many companies will attend events, meetups, job fairs, etc...so you can get to speak with someone at the company. I know many people who have reached out to individuals in similar jobs at the company of their dream to ask for a 15 min informational interview or just asked a few questions over email. Companies like this, it shows that you are interested in them, it is a mark of motivation.

In small companies, it is more likely that 'knowing someone' might get you the job but that's often because it is more cost effective for the company to do that. After all if you have someone already who can do it, then why spend the time and money trying to source candidates? However, in practice, this doesn't happen very often - the job market is not very efficient and it is rare that a small business owner will know just the right person available at the right time and willing to work for them for all of their positions. While you might be hearing a lot about it, in reality, you still have plenty of chances!

Now, you may have heard about networking - this is the art of forming alliances, getting to know people and getting people to know you. That way, you increase the likelihood that when someone needs somebody just like you, they will ask their friend whom you know and that friend will recommend at least an initial conversation with you. The best way to do this is to help others. Get a profile on LinkedIn, invite people to ask you questions, help them solve their own professional problems. Post on Quora. People will remember you and also know what your interests and skills are. If you meet someone in person at an event, connect with them on LinkedIn and volunteer valuable information (not noise!) when you come across it. Over time, these people will start helping you too because they will want help from their network on a continuous basis.
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Eula’s Answer

Meritocracy is an organization that rewards it best achievers and is based on the merits of your work.
It is good, because it will bring a best effort from everyone.
Sometimes this can create competition among the employees, because everyone wants to be the best.
If the company gives a prize to only 1 and there are many employees, say 100, they all want to be recognized.


MERITOCRACY is not influence. Many times when you know someone they can introduce you, because they know that you are capable and competent and can do the job.
but the job you need to do yourself and the merits come from doing an EXCELLENT job.


The company if it's a good one does not rely on you.
If you get sick for instance, they still need to get the work done and will let someone else do it for you.


You do not need to know someone to help you get the job. What you need to do is
GO IN THERE AND SHOW YOUR BEST SELF.
SMILE and HAVE CONFIDENCE IN YOUR HEART.
Be Brave, Be Zealous and Be the best one to do the job
This is your MERIT. You have earned a position for being brave, for being good at what you do.

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Donna’s Answer

Tharles;

Human Resources departments fight against favoritism and prejudice judgement selections everyday. Interview processes have been streamlined to have all applicants get asked the same questions and hiring decisions are sometime joint decisions between a couple individuals. But this is in larger companies and corporations.

Bias is part of human psychology and influences decisions. So unfortunately you may be passed up on an internship or two because the 2nd cousin of the manager looking for an intern is also an applicant. Or you may be passed up because the interviewer has an aversion to women wearing makeup, and thought you had too much on. Or we can get into more politically motivated discussions on why you may be passed up due to age, color, or sexual orientation. What ever the case your action is critical. Pick yourself up and go back out there and search some more. Point out the disparity to your interviewer and ask for a deeper explanation? Your view of the matter may not be the same as the interviewer has. Maybe the 2nd cousin was chosen over you because they already have intimate knowledge of the task the internship will be completing and the company doesn't have time this year to train an intern. Thus the prior experience statement holds more weight than having completed 2 years of college.

If your assumptions prove to be correct. How far are you willing to pursue the matter? Even if you ultimately win the internship the experience is now going to be tainted and will more than likely have become the water cooler gossip within the company. Yet ethical matters should be presented to the human resources team at least to help the next candidate in line for internship, new hire, etc....
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