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What are hard parts about being a manufacturing engineer?

My future trends will help me in life want hard things then most people do not know.

Thank you comment icon Would you provide a more specific question (or questions)? I am an engineer who worked in industry. What would you like me to explain? Dan Wolf
Thank you comment icon What was the hard thing about it. Javelle

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Anh’s Answer

You are planning for your future by asking a career question. That's good!

I am an engineer in manufacturing. This is what Mfg Engrs do: We set up procedures and processes in the factory to assemble, test, and ship products worldwide. We teach assemblers to put a product (like a computer) together. Then we teach the operators to run test programs to make sure the product work. Then we show the packout people how to package the product and all its accessories for shipping. We repeat this for factories in the US, Mexico, Europe, and Far East. Factory certification and continuous process and quality improvements are part of the job too.

On some days, the work can be hard or demanding. But your good attitude and your team spirit will prevail in the end.

To be a Mfg Engr, most people get an Industrial Engineering degree. Electrical or Computer Engineering degree are applicable too.

This can be a good field of work, as many factories are returning production to the US (from overseas.) Best wishes to you. Keep exploring your options. Keep asking questions!
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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Javelle. Thanks for your question.

While I am not a Manufacturer Engineer, I did get my engineering degree in Systems Engineering. And I will fully acknowledge that in getting that degree, there were some hard classes...but...I knew that eventually, I would pass the class and move on. I also knew that because I had an interest in completing my program to get my degree (fueled by an understanding of the types of jobs I could get ;)), I had a drive to get it done and to move on to a job where I could learn and grow. I offer you this additional thought process...that is to try not to focus on what is hard about completing your degree...and maybe focus on all of the benefits that will come to you once you have obtained your degree.

I understand that it is natural to worry about completing your program. I worried :) but I didn't allow those concerns to stop me from completing my degree. I graduated from college many years ago, have had great career opportunities and after 20+ years in my career, still do.

Whatever obstacles you encounter during your degree program, I imagine that you will be able to overcome them, learn from them and be able to face your future with confidence and a drive to do well.

Best of luck to you!
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Joseph’s Answer

The choice of language regarding "future trends" in your question makes it difficult to correctly understand what your intended question is - perhaps you'd like to review and rephrase? However, from your reply to Dan, I think what you're asking is "What are the difficulties of being a Manufacturing Engineer that people might not know about?"

I'm a physicist rather than an engineer, but I worked for a few years in a specialist instrumentation manufacturing company, and worked with the engineers. Here's a couple of things based on my experience:

Something I saw them have particular difficulties with was ensuring compliance with various ISO, ASME, UL etc standards for quality and safety; and working with Management Systems like ISO9001. Our Management System was certified by strict external assessors, and the system our Quality Manager had set up was hard to find things in, and had some very nit-picking requirements, making it hard (or even impossible) to produce products and the supporting documentation that met all the requirements.

Another thing is communicating back and forward between customers (especially when they have changing requirements), and suppliers (getting quotes, dealing with deliveries, handling sub-par quality issues) - the more "project management" aspects of Manufacturing Engineering. That could certainly be a difficulty if clear communication doesn't come easy to you for any reason.
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