Skip to main content
11 answers
11
Updated 422 views

How do I know that the career I'm going to choose will be right for my future?

I'm interested in becoming a registered nurse

This question was asked by a student anonymously

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

11

11 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Bhavna’s Answer

The best way to know if a career is right for your future is to do some research. Ask yourself questions like, what steps are necessary to achieve success in this field? Talk to professionals in the field and explore your interests, strengths and weaknesses. Take time to read up on the job in detail and see if it meets your expectations. Talk to other nurses and understand the challenges and rewards of the job. Attend information sessions, job fairs and shadowing experiences at nursing facilities and hospitals. Finally, trust your intuition, if you feel like you can commit to the job and find satisfaction in it, go for it!
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Chirayu’s Answer

Choosing a career can be a difficult and daunting task, and it's normal to have concerns about whether the career you choose will be the right fit for you in the future. Here are a few tips to help you make an informed decision:

Research different careers: Look into the day-to-day responsibilities, required skills, and long-term prospects of different careers that interest you. This will help you to get a better understanding of what you would be doing in the field and whether it aligns with your interests and goals. Get experience: Try to gain some experience in the field through internships, volunteer work, or part-time jobs. This will give you a better sense of whether you enjoy the work and whether you have the skills and abilities required for the job. Talk to people in the field: Speak with professionals who are currently working in the field you're considering. They can provide valuable insight into what it's like to work in the field and what kind of skills and qualifications are needed to succeed. Consider your values and preferences: Think about what is important to you in a career. For example, do you value flexibility, stability, creativity, or helping others? How much travel, stress, and change are you willing to tolerate? Be open-minded: Remember that your career path may not be a straight line. Many people change careers multiple times throughout their lives, so it's important to be open to new opportunities and to keep learning and developing new skills. Consider taking career assessments, these are designed to help you identify your interests, skills, and values and match them with the right career options.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sunil’s Answer

You want to choose a career which you find interesting and enjoy working in that field. as long as you are enjoying working in your career and are comfortable working in that field, your career goal is achieved. monitory benefits as secondary as long as you enjoy working in the field you choose.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Andrew’s Answer

Shadowing someone who does what you’re interested in is great. Talking to anyone who will speak to you that works in your area of interest is instrumental as well. But I noticed that you asked whether your career will be right for your future and I can’t help but notice the intentional vagueness in that question. If you mean will it provide for you in a monetary way, then you look it up on salary.com and get an idea of annual salary. But if you’re talking about whether it will satisfy that burning in your soul that is looking for something meaningful, and I think that’s where you’re going, than we are talking about something else entirely.
As someone who has changed careers multiple times, I can tell you that reality rarely matches your imagination. The more that you can volunteer, observe, or speak with people in your chosen field, the better idea you will have. However, that still might not be accurate. I started wanting to be a marine biologist because I grew up watching Jacques Cousteau. Then I joined the navy because I watched Top Gun. In the navy I learned I loved computers, so I became an analyst at a hospital. Absolutely came to hate working in the computer field. But guess what? While working in that hospital I backed into the car of an occupational therapist. While speaking with her, I asked if I could observe her clinic. I was hooked!
I guess my point is, you make a decision with the best information available. Life happens and pushes you in all sorts of directions. Process that new information and compare it to your previous experiences. Come to a conclusion after thinking about it and talking about it with people you respect. Then, go for it! If you made a bad decision then you’ll figure it out eventually. Nobody said you can’t change your mind. A wise person once said “life is what happens when you’re busy making other plans.” Who cares if it doesn’t all happen the way you planned it? That’s what makes life so interesting!
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

First you do everything you possibly can to find out what the career is "really" like. Find opportunities to shadow, ask questions here, including asking about what people think is the best and worst part of the jobs. Take some health career classes.

But, here's the thing. If this general area is of interest to you, there are always options to pursue. There are different environments where one can be an RN. One can work in a hospital, a doctor's office, or even go into teaching. You can go work for an insurance company as a utilization review nurse. So, it's not like the end of the world if your first job doesn't feel right. Sometimes it's just a matter of finding the right fit! There are so many different aspects to healthcare careers! So, go for it. Keep your training and resume current, and learn about "transferrable job skills."

Those are skills that you acquire in one position that you can use in another. Attention to detail, analytical reasoning, etc. I once worked with a client who wanted to work at a doggy day care facility, and her only experience was in fast-food. The job announcement emphasized cleanliness (a concern for disease control/prevention). My client worked midnights in fast food. What did she do all night? Clean? Why? To prevent illness. Your ability to be creative in marketing yourself will open many doors!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Megan’s Answer

The good thing is, this is your time to find out. :) I switched majors 3 times in college. Journalism, psychology, and got my bachelor's in social work. I practiced social works for over 5 years, no longer felt it was right for me. I then went back to school and got my medical assisting degree. I have been one for almost 15 years and love it! The point to all that is, you will figure out what you are meant to do. Think about what sparks your interest, that gives you joy. Go with that. Take care and good luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Dear CVOH,

To evaluate if the nursing profession aligns with your career aspirations, ponder over the following aspects:

Passions and Principles: Contemplate your reasons for considering nursing. If aiding others, making a significant impact in their lives, and thriving in a healthcare environment resonate with your passions, nursing might be the perfect choice for you.

Educational and Training Requirements: A particular educational background and training are prerequisites for nursing. To qualify as a registered nurse (RN), you need to acquire an Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN) or a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). Furthermore, passing the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) is mandatory to practice nursing.

Employment Prospects: The need for healthcare services is predicted to rise due to the aging demographic and the perpetual demand for healthcare professionals. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts a 9% growth in registered nurse employment from 2020 to 2030, creating approximately 276,800 new jobs. This growth rate surpasses the average for all professions.

Workplace Preferences: Nurses operate in diverse settings such as hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and private practices. Determine the work environment that aligns with your preferences. For instance, if you thrive in a dynamic setting dealing with varied patient cases, hospital nursing might be ideal. Conversely, if you value stable work hours and establishing long-term patient relationships, primary care or long-term care facilities might be more suitable.

Income: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the median annual wage for registered nurses was $75,330 in May 2020. However, salaries can fluctuate based on factors such as geographical location, workplace, and experience level.

Career Progression: The nursing field offers a plethora of specializations and career advancement opportunities. Some RNs opt to pursue higher degrees like a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) or a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) to evolve into nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, or nurse midwives. These advanced roles typically offer higher remuneration and increased responsibilities.

Work-Life Equilibrium: The nursing profession can demand varying schedules based on the role and workplace. Assess if you are comfortable with shift duties, being on-call, or working during weekends and holidays if required.

Personal Attributes: Reflect on your personal strengths and how they align with the nursing profession. Successful nurses typically exhibit strong communication skills, empathy, critical thinking capabilities, and physical endurance.

Before finalizing your decision to pursue nursing, it could be beneficial to shadow or converse with seasoned nurses to gain firsthand insights into their daily responsibilities and experiences in the field.

May God bless you!
James Constantine.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Bether’s Answer

if you are interested in the medical field, take a quick course at a community college and become a nursing assistant. you can work as a nursing assistant while you are in college and see if you like it. some hospitals will pay for your nursing school if you work as a nursing assistant there. you can also take a community college course to become an EMT if you would rather do that. volunteer somewhere that you are possibly interested in working. or try to get an entry level job there. if you are interested in becoming a doctor these jobs will help, or when you are 18 you can become a scribe for a doctor. this should give you an idea if the field is right for you.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Caroline’s Answer

Talk to other nurses and nursing students. Shadow and volunteer at a hospital or doctors office. People love talking about their job and their passions.

I'm not a nurse but I know the profession has a lot of lateral movement. Meaning if you don't like working on a floor that specializes in orthopedics, strokes, pediatrics, cardiac, critical care, etc. you can apply to different areas. There is also opportunities for community work as a public health nurse or administrative work. It's an expansive field with a lot of opportunities to help a variety of populations.

Best of luck!

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tricia’s Answer

Hello - I've been nursing for 30 years and one of the attributes I have often touted is that there is extreme variability in roles. Multiple factors are influential in making a role satisfying - coworkers, leaders, patient population, schedule, commute, and family life for example. Consider if all these factors remain the same but a nurse was to experience the difference between inpatient acute care nursing DAYshift and NIGHTshift - well, it's as different as night and day. Then consider the differences between the realms of psychiatric nursing, neonatal nursing, community health, and informatics for a couple of examples, as well as the range of levels of education you can choose from associate's, bachelor's, doctorate, nurse practitioner - and the lists go on and on. Becoming a Registered Nurse opens a door to a world of opportunities, where I believe, if you choose to do so, you may find the right spot for you at certain periods of your life. As your life changes, your career does not necessarily have to change - but your role in that career might. I wish you success in whatever career path you choose.

Tricia Nicks, MSN, BSN, RN, CPAN, CMSRN
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sharon’s Answer

It may be hard to know this now. Do you like learning about people, health, diseases, communication? The list is endless.
Nursing is a career with endless possibilities.
0