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What is the best field to work in when trying to become a welder?

My name is Keaton I'm from Rock Hill, and I'm hoping to become a welder when I get out of school but I'm wondering which field of work is the most enjoyable, and the most rewarding when becoming a welder.

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Jeffrey’s Answer

There’s some good advice on here for you! Most definitely a vocational welding class or college class. You have many choices in the welding industry from Structural to aerospace. What I would do is finish out high school and enroll in a college course for welding. Get certified in all the major welding processes 3 &. 4 g plates at least. Once you have that start working on your pipe certs 2g 5g 6g 6gr. You are young so take that time to learn all your disciplines. Welding is not just welding two pieces of metal together. Pay attention during the theory part of it. Learn the science behind it, the codes that you will be welding to, and learn how to read drawings (blueprints). These skills put together will make you not only a certified welder, but a skilled welder. If you like traveling to different cities to work, join a union like the iron workers or pile drivers. You will help erect structural buildings, bridges, etc. There pipe welding which is a very lucrative position. Join your local AWS chapter and network, ask questions and learn from the pros!
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Manny’s Answer

If you choose welding for your career, I would choose a welding school in your town or area and study all the welding processes get the experience you need. pipe welding is also a popular field to get into. ASME Code welding is also a high-paying welding job, welding pressure vessels. start out as an apprentice and work your way up.
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Keith’s Answer

Finish high school first and then look for a trade school locally that offers a welding program and apply. Complete the program and start your life as a trademan. Find an apprenticeship or mentorship to get some real experience in the field.
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Mack’s Answer

Hey Keaton,

Good input from Manny, Harry, and Keith.

If you are in the Rock Hill School District, check with the Applied Technology Center. Maybe even give them a call.
https://www.rock-hill.k12.sc.us/Domain/1390
803-981-1100

York Technical College has a welding program:
https://www.yorktech.edu/Welding-Technology/
(803) 981-7073

At either school, ask if you can talk to the welding instructor. You may have to set up an appointment even to get a phone conversation, but they should be pleased to give you some advice.

Also, check out this sort video to hear from a young man who seems to be enjoying his job as a welder in South Carolina:
https://www.scetv.org/stories/tags/your-path-your-journey

There is no question that there is a need for good, certified welders and the field is pretty broad. Good luck.
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Daniel’s Answer

Consider enrolling in a welding school to kickstart your journey. Absorb as much knowledge as you can. Watch welding videos on YouTube to expand your understanding. The world of welding can open up some exciting opportunities, but you must be willing to put in the effort. Initially, try to gain experience in a factory or fabrication shop to familiarize yourself with the basics. Welding isn't a suitable career for everyone, so ensure it's something you genuinely enjoy. As your skills improve, start exploring different opportunities. If you love to travel, there are welding jobs that can accommodate that. You might spend a few months to a year in one location before moving on to the next. If you're up for a challenge, look into underwater or offshore welding. If you enjoy stick welding and have a passion for travel, consider working on the pipelines. The opportunities in welding are virtually limitless. There's a welding job to match any lifestyle you wish to lead. All it takes is time, commitment, and hard work.
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Harry’s Answer

There is no real right or wrong answer to this question. You gravitate to where you see opportunity and where you feel lead. Structural steel welding is probably the most valued right now because of the construction market and the amount of buildings still being built and this is probably not going to change much. The second would probably be pressure pipe welding which is also much needed. And I would say that if you want to get extensive and very high pay is underwater welding. Experience and certification is key in any of these avenues. Get your high school diploma and then find a good trade school and enlist in their welding program. They can expose you to a lot of opportunity and direction that you may not have thought about.
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Noah’s Answer

Hi Keaton,
Honestly I think whatever particular field of welding you decide to work in is rewarding. Start out small learn the basics of structural stick, gmaw, and fcaw. Definitely go to a trade school and learn more about the procedural aspects of welding to a code and get certified. Learn the basics of fitting because you may also have to fit and weld the joint(s) on the job. I’m biased in the sense that I work in a shipyard doing structural ultrasound and X-ray work I really enjoy it there is always something new to learn whether it’s a small detail that helps long term or it’s a major technique that you need to develop. There is always something to learn and build upon what you already know that’s what I personally enjoy about this trade. Pressure and sanitary pipe welding is definitely a field worth looking into especially as far as contracting you get paid to learn more about welding exotic materials like Nickel Copper or Cress. I wouldn’t worry about specifics just pick whichever welding process you’re most interesting in and get your feet wet because it’s a muscle memory skill so you can’t get better at it if you’re not doing it. But main focus is Graduate, possibly look into trade school, get certified, and get out there.
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