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What are certain details that I should know about 'Construction Managers'?

I have been trying to build my career, and I am considering being in debt to obtain a bachelor's Degree to achieve my goals.

I want to be ambitious and associate to build amazing places instead of drains or roads.

1. what is the job like?
2. how did you get into the position?
3. what are the hardest parts of the job?
4. what are the best parts of the job?
5. where else would the career go?
6. what advice should you have for someone like me?
7. what are the salaries like?
8. who else should I talk to?

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Cory’s Answer

Feels like most of your questions have been answered in a very complete sense. I have done construction management as a part of my career since the beginning and agreement with most of the information provided above.

What would offer is this on networking? Most states and I assume Alaska is no different. If you cannot connect in person reach out by phone. Most population centers have an Association of General Contractors. This group is not a CM Peer Group but the actual businesses in the area pooling resources to lobby, set standards, etc…. Reach out to this group and try to connect with a company that does the work you like to do. It would be best to know the companies within the group. Should no company suit your preference locally then you could google a national group and connect with the closest company listed in the national group. Good luck!
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William’s Answer

Construction Managers are good communication, resource, time, risk, stakeholder and quality managers.
They are people who live to travel from place to place, and able to stay in a location for a long period.
Construction Managers are technical discipline professionals with in-depth knowledge of the built environment and construction standards, regulations, guides, methods, materials, plants, equipments and mechinaries.
Construction Managers are required to be physically and medically fit to be able to face the roughnecks that are involved in construction.
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Jason’s Answer

There are a lot of nuances to your questions, not all construction manager positions are equal, have equal challenges or equal knowledge requirements. I've worked road construction projects, residential and commercial construction and now construction in the energy industry. The rate of pay depends on experience and industry. An entry level CM might make 40-50K in lighter construction especially for smaller companies while a CM in a large gas and oil corporation might make 100-200K depending again on education and experience. It's a rewarding career. I'll approach your questions from the industry I currently serve, the petroleum industry.

1. what is the job like?
It's an adventure, it's challenging and rewarding both in professional compensation and personal satisfation. The projects I work on keep me on the road tralleling to new jobsites. Life on the road is difficult and not for everyone, particularly if you're leaving loved ones behind.
2. how did you get into the position?
Years of hard work and learning from everyone I could find to share information. In the energy industry it's helpful to have a network of people to work with, learn from and down the road they may reach out with new opportunities(People out here like working with people they knw and can rely on).
3. what are the hardest parts of the job?
The travel, long hours( I average 70-90 hours a week) and working in the elements. It can be difficult to deal with the large personalities and ego's out in the industry also.
4. what are the best parts of the job?
This will be a different answer for everyone. In my case I enjoy the challenge of problem solving, every jobsite is different with different challenges even if you're building the same thing as the last jobsite.
5. where else would the career go?
CM's with a proven record of good managment and communication skills can easily move into a low to mid management position particularly if they are continuing their education, picking up industry certifications and some business or engineering classes.
6. what advice should you have for someone like me?
7. what are the salaries like?
I answered this in my opening.
8. who else should I talk to?
Find a reddit group or a group on LinkedIn for CM's or project management.
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James Constantine’s Answer

HELLO RICHARD LEE,

I am a computer dietitian, but will research 'construction manager' on the Internet ...

Construction Managers

1. What is the job like?

Construction managers are responsible for overseeing construction projects from beginning to end. Their duties typically include planning, budgeting, coordinating, and supervising construction projects. They work closely with architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders to ensure that projects are completed on time and within budget. Construction managers also monitor compliance with building codes, safety regulations, and other legal requirements.

In addition to the technical aspects of construction management, these professionals also handle administrative tasks such as obtaining permits, preparing contracts, and managing project documentation. Communication skills are crucial in this role as construction managers need to effectively communicate with various parties involved in the project.

2. How did you get into the position?

To become a construction manager, individuals typically need a bachelor’s degree in construction management, civil engineering, architecture, or a related field. Some professionals may start in entry-level positions in construction and work their way up through experience and on-the-job training. Obtaining certifications such as the Certified Construction Manager (CCM) designation can also enhance career prospects in this field.

3. What are the hardest parts of the job?

Some of the challenges faced by construction managers include managing tight project deadlines, dealing with unexpected issues or delays during construction, balancing competing priorities from different stakeholders, and ensuring compliance with complex regulations and safety standards. The job can be demanding and stressful at times due to the high level of responsibility involved in overseeing large-scale projects.

4. What are the best parts of the job?

Despite its challenges, being a construction manager can be rewarding. Seeing a project come to life from concept to completion can be fulfilling. Construction managers have the opportunity to work on diverse projects that shape communities and leave a lasting impact on the built environment. The role also offers good earning potential and opportunities for career advancement.

5. Where else would the career go?

Construction managers can advance their careers by taking on larger or more complex projects, moving into roles such as senior project manager or director of construction. Some may choose to specialize in specific types of construction such as residential, commercial, or industrial projects. With experience and expertise, construction managers may also transition into consulting or teaching roles within the industry.

6. What advice should you have for someone like me?

If you are considering a career as a construction manager, it is important to gain relevant education and experience in the field. Networking with professionals in the industry can provide valuable insights and opportunities for career growth. Developing strong organizational skills, attention to detail, problem-solving abilities, and leadership qualities will also be beneficial for success in this role.

7. What are the salaries like?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median annual wage for construction managers was $95,260 as of May 2020. Salaries can vary based on factors such as experience level, location, type of employer, and size of projects managed.

8. Who else should I talk to?

To gain further insights into the field of construction management, consider reaching out to professionals currently working as construction managers or industry associations such as the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA). Attending networking events or informational interviews can help you learn more about career paths within this field.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) - Provides reliable data on employment statistics including salary information for various occupations.
Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) - Offers resources and support for professionals in the field of construction management.
Certified Construction Manager (CCM) Program - Provides certification programs that enhance professional credentials in construction management.

GOD BLESS YOU RICHLY!
JC
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Don’s Answer

Richard,

Building a career in construction management can be an incredibly rewarding experience, but it's not for the faint of heart. It's a challenging mix of pressure, problem-solving, and the immense satisfaction of seeing a project go from blueprint to reality.

My own path wasn't traditional. I started as a pipefitter, getting my hands dirty and learning the industry from the ground up. That experience proved invaluable when I transitioned to management. It allows me to understand the challenges faced by the crew and communicate effectively.

Now, let's talk honestly about the realities of the job. Stress and maintaining a healthy work-life balance are constant battles. This career can be all-consuming if you let it. But when you overcome a seemingly insurmountable obstacle, or finally complete a complex project – that feeling of accomplishment is unmatched.

The good news is there are options within construction management. If the constant pressure isn't for you, there are paths in quality control or inspection that offer a bit more stability. You could also climb the ladder into program or operations management, where the focus shifts from day-to-day execution to selecting projects that align with the company's goals.

Here's some crucial advice: going into debt for a degree shouldn't be your only option. Scholarships and grants are absolutely worth exploring. And if you're serious about this field, consider following a similar path to mine – gaining hands-on experience as a skilled tradesperson first. The best managers I know all cut their teeth that way.

Salary expectations can vary widely, from around $65,000 to well over $160,000. But remember, a hefty paycheck shouldn't come at the expense of your personal life. Find a balance that works for you.

Now, let's get you started on your research journey. Connect with professionals on LinkedIn who have the kind of career you envision. Ask them questions! Job fairs are another great resource. Attend industry events in your area and be prepared to delve deeper with specific questions.

Remember, this is just the first step. There's a wealth of information out there waiting to be discovered. Feel free to reach out if anything I mentioned sparks further questions.

Good luck, Richard!
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