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I am a high school sophomore and have no extracurriculars currently besides 20 community service, I plan on doing SYEP (career skill building work, and you have to research a research question, which I plan on making medical related) this summer and Girls Who Code for skill building on the side for my future resume. I also am secretary of a newspaper club but thats all. Am I on the path for success or is it far too late for me to have enough extracurriculars by the end of junior year Are you guys aware of any medical internships for 15 year olds in NYC? ?

I am in 10th grade, a sophmore, 15 y/o, female, and live in NYC.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Ally’s Answer

You are definitely not too late! I only started really focusing on medicine as a junior in high school. A really great way to gain medical experience while still in high school is being a certified nursing assistant. There are lots of technical schools that offer a certification program, and it is relatively low price (I’m from PA, im not sure what the prices are in NY). If you are a CNA, you can gain patient care hours that will be required for medical school. It allows you to get a real taste of working in medicine, and it has been one of the best experiences of my life!
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Ava’s Answer

Yashika, all of the activities you listed ARE extracurriculars, and very great ones to have in high school! I was a math tutor in high school, but didn't start officially working until halfway through my Associate's in college. The companies I work for now actually partner with Girls Who Code! I am not in the medical industry (I'm in technology), but I think you're already going above and beyond to show your interest. Even in college and beyond, it is not too late to find success. It is never too late unless you give up and don't fuel your goals with action. You're still young, you still have time.

Ask your school if there are any internships, student mentorship or volunteer programs, and scholarships you can apply for. I also recommend searching on websites like Indeed, Glassdoor, and Ziprecruiter (or just Googling something like "medical student jobs new york 2024"). Keep in mind that many of these opportunities may be for college students specifically, but it never hurts to check. Also, research career pathways to focus your search. There are many roles in the medical industry, especially when you involve tech. Try to narrow down a small group of roles/skills you want to specialize in.

Always be proud of what you've achieved so far, and then keep going! Best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much Ms. Adams, I appreciate all this insight and your reassurance! I will be sure to reach out to my school and also google research and internship opportunities. I am also in the process of finding specific medical specialties, so this is good news to know I am on track with that. Have a great day! Yashika
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Stephanie’s Answer

It's great that you're thinking about building your extracurricular activities and exploring opportunities for skill-building and career exploration. It's never too late to start, and you still have time to develop a strong extracurricular profile by the end of your junior year. Here are some suggestions for your path to success:

1. SYEP and Girls Who Code: Participating in the SYEP and joining Girls Who Code are excellent choices for skill-building and adding to your extracurricular activities. These experiences will provide valuable learning opportunities and demonstrate your interest in computer science and technology.

2. Newspaper club: Being the secretary of a newspaper club is a noteworthy extracurricular activity that shows your dedication, organizational skills, and communication abilities. Make sure to highlight your responsibilities and achievements within the club on your resume.

3. Research opportunities: Consider reaching out to local universities, hospitals, or research institutions to inquire about any research internships or programs available for high school students. While it can be challenging to find medical internships specifically for 15-year-olds, there may be research opportunities that align with your interests.

4. Volunteer work: Look for volunteer opportunities in healthcare settings, such as hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes. Not only will this provide you with exposure to the medical field, but it will also demonstrate your commitment to serving others.

5. Online courses and certifications: Explore online platforms that offer courses and certifications related to the medical field. Completing relevant courses and earning certifications can showcase your dedication to learning and acquiring specialized knowledge.

6. College summer programs: Many universities offer summer programs for high school students interested in various subjects, including medicine. Research and apply to these programs to gain valuable insights and experiences.

Remember, the quality of your extracurricular activities is just as important as the quantity. Focus on activities that align with your interests and demonstrate your skills, passion, and commitment. Additionally, continue to excel academically and build strong relationships with teachers who may provide recommendations for college applications.

While I don't have specific information on medical internships for 15-year-olds in NYC, I recommend reaching out to local hospitals, research institutions, and organizations focused on healthcare education to inquire about potential opportunities. They may have programs or initiatives specifically designed for high school students. Additionally, consider speaking with your school's guidance counselor for further guidance and resources.

Keep exploring your interests, seeking opportunities, and building your skills and experiences. With dedication and perseverance, you can create a well-rounded extracurricular profile that supports your future goals.
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Elizabeth’s Answer

You are never too late to try anything and everything you want to. Follow your passions and try new things to see what makes it feel more less like work. The Extracurriculars you currently have are so important to building what you want. You have the ability to always add. I am 50 and 2 years ago I received my second Master’s. Nothing is ever too late.
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