4 answers

How Did You Figure Out What Your Dream Job Was?

Asked Blaine, Minnesota

I'm a high school senior who has wanted to be a veterinarian ever since middle school, but after shadowing every veterinarian in my area, I realized that I did not want to be a veterinarian anymore. Since then, I have changed my "career path" numerous times. I thought I wanted to be a wildlife biologist, a photographer, a dancer, a choreographer, a systems architect, a lawyer, an environmentalist, a teacher, a surgeon, and more. I just can't decide on anything and due to the fact that I have my 2-year AA degree (through PSEO) my generals are all completed so I really only need to do 2 more years of college for my intended major, but I don't know what it is yet.
Any advice would be appreciated!
#stressed #help #veterinarian #dance #choreography #wildlife-biology #environmental-science #systemsarchitect #surgeon #teacher #lawyer #photography #pseo

4 answers

Lissa’s Answer

Updated Dallas, Texas

Hi Bridget!!

Well, you are on the right path with determining your "Dream Job," by shadowing the prospective job(s) you desire. I'm sorry that becoming a Vet did not work out for you, but at least you found out before spending years in the field...like some people.


When I think about a "dream job," it is something that you wouldn't mind doing...even if you didn't get paid for it!! A dream job has to tap into your passionate side. It takes into consideration your personality, your beliefs, your financial security, your future goals in life, etc. Basically, it's very personal and something you can see yourself doing for a very long time, if not for the rest of your life.


Since you are just starting out in your career, don;t stress too much about it because you will have a better sense of things after you have worked several jobs and obtain more experience in the working world. Take this time now, while you are still young, to explore various career options before you narrow your "dream job" down to one thing.


Good luck!!

Victoria’s Answer

Updated Dallas, Texas

Hi Bridget,


I love your question because I can see you are thinking about all the different possibilities.

Some people know exactly what they want to do from the start, but most people don't and that is totally okay!


By volunteering for veterinarians, you figured out that that specific job wasn't a good fit for you.

You are on the right track! Keep volunteering for organizations and projects that sound interesting to you.

Use all your skills - it sounds like you have some amazing interests!

Volunteering and/or internships will help you meet new people, find mentors, and guide you in your search for your perfect career. Keep a journal of what you liked and didn't like.


Talk to as many people as you can in all different fields: by talking you will describe what you like and why. Your ideas and interests will start to gel and make sense. These clues (interests) will lead you in the right direction. Watch TED talks, documentaries, and the news to find ideas.

Every time you see something that sparks your imagination, write it down. Review your notes/pictures/doodles and look for the common patterns.


Most people will have 4 - 6 jobs over the course of their lives.

Many jobs that will be important to the future haven't been created yet.

Find a field or fields that are interesting to you and become a life long learner.


Since you have two more years of college left, start with the basics: over 75% of the jobs by 2020 will require STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)

There are many, many jobs in STEM fields and the number will only increase.

By having a solid foundation in one or more of these areas you will be prepared to take on opportunities in the future. Go to each department and visit with students and professors to see if these fields seem interesting.


One way to think about your dream job is to look at all the careers in this book (see next steps):


Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type

https://www.amazon.com/Paul-D.-Tieger/e/B000AQ7020/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1523565504&sr=8-2


Dream job: I have so many interests: I went to business school and kept asking professors about careers that combined technology with business and risk management. I kept asking the question. I kept looking for and finding interesting internships, volunteer opportunities, classes and mentors. I figured out that I really like applying technology to business problems. So for me an MBA was perfect and led to a series of dream jobs.


Check out this book and let us know what looks interesting to you.


Victoria recommends the following next steps:

  • Keep volunteering for organizations and projects that sound interesting to you. Use all your skills - it sounds like you have some amazing interests!
  • Since you have two more years of college left, start with the basics: over 75% of the jobs by 2020 will require STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). Consider STEM careers.
  • One way to think about your dream job is to look at all the careers in this book: Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type https://www.amazon.com/Paul-D.-Tieger/e/B000AQ7020/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1523565504&sr=8-2 Check each career that looks interesting and write down why. You can use sticky notes and make a big map. Everyone's dream job is different, which is why you have to find what is right for you :)

Dennis’s Answer

Updated Ann Arbor, Michigan

Hello Bridget:


You seem to be on the fast track toward a college degree. Therefore it's natural that you are having anxieties. Typically students use their first two years in college to try out subjects in different fields before deciding on their majors. My stepson spent four years getting a degree in art before deciding to go into architecture which took him another four years. I do not recommend this.


I experimented a lot as an undergraduate, finally graduating with a group major in social sciences and a second major in sociology. This didn't qualify me for much except graduate school or a job in insurance or social work. So I did social work for a decade while sampling more subjects such as advertising and various photography workshops. I further learned photography from books, going to art museums, and practicing it on my own. I also volunteered to do the photography for a couple of organizations.


While earning a living on the social work job that provided good vacation leave, I took up travel writing and photography submitting on spec to magazines. This led to part-time freelance opportunities of assignments for magazines, which led to quitting the social work job to do my "dream job" as a freelance photographer exploring the world and being published in magazines, books, and corporate publications. What I learned from this process was to take advantage of opportunities as they arose and to create my own opportunities.


To cut a very long, complicated story short, you may not learn what your dream job is until you have it. Then all you have to do is be resourceful enough to hang onto it since industries, such as photography, change quickly due to evolving technology.

Dennis recommends the following next steps:

  • Be open to new ideas and subjects. Let your intuition lead you toward occupations that interest you. Be open to opportunities that as they arise. And perhaps, slow down and worry less about what you'll be doing for a career. It might turn out to be something, a dream job, you never considered until you're in it.

Michael’s Answer

Updated

Hi Bridget,


Great question, and one that many people deal and struggle with. I certainly did. I think you are already doing the right activities by volunteering and being inquisitive about different types of roles. What really helped me was taking a career aptitude test that showed me I would thrive in a relationship-building role. I coupled this with my passion for sales/business development and that is the sort of role I am in today. Some people never truly find their dream job, I would just find a role that makes you happy and provides you a comfortable living.


Once you enter into college, I would advise going to their career center and speaking with the folks there, that was also quite helpful for me. Have as many conversations as you can, continue to pursue interests, be inquisitive and don't give up. You will find something that you enjoy.


Thanks!


Mike