9 answers
Asked Viewed 131 times Translate

Is being a prodigy a necessity in the sports industry?

Will I be disadvantaged in the sports industry if I am not a prodigy in a specific sport? As many professional athlete have experience and training from a young age, does it count if I am a latecomer in the sports industry and have little experience?

#athletics #sports #connectedbysports #late bloomer


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
9
100% of 8 Pros

9 answers


Updated Translate

Cindie’s Answer

Hi Nievedha. You ask a very interesting question. The sports industry, as you can imagine, has a lot of parts to it. In addition to the players, for pro organizations, you have the business owner(s), and in all organized sports, there are sports operations that include all facets that you would find in any business like finance, marketing, public relations, sports talent management and so forth.

As far as being a player in a sports, I wouldn't say you have to be a prodigy, but you do need to have a notable talent for the sport that causes you to rise above many. And the higher you desire to go as a player of sports not only should your talent be that much better but you should be willing to sacrifice a lot in terms of time and your personal relationships. If you play on a college team, you'll travel a lot during your season and perhaps off season so you won't be able to participate in some activities in college like a lot of other non-sports students. In the pro ranks, you'll travel a lot, so it'll be challenging to have a personal or family life. You'll certainly have to find the right person who will understand that your job is a traveling job, and if you have kids, child care will largely fall on your partner.

With that said, you can be the very best sports player you can be given your talents and work very hard and make it big in college and maybe the pros, but if your talent and hard work are not enough to make a career of being a player, you can use your knowledge as a player in other areas of the sports business. If you like to teach and develop talent, you could be a coach. There are many, many examples of outstanding, winning coaches who were not the top players. You could be a trainer. You could be a sports news caster. You could be in any facet of sports business management including marketing, finance, accounting, human resources, etc. Sports is a business.

So the short answer is, if you want to be a player at the top ranks of a chosen sport, yes, you need to be talented *and* you need to be a hard worker and be willing to sacrifice some personal aspects---at least for a period of time--of life in order to be very successful in sports. But even if you cannot make a career of being a player, you can certainly rise in any area of the sports industry.

Whatever you decide to do, I hope you will, above all, believe in yourself and challenge yourself to make the most of the unique talents that you have. You live in a day and time that needs you to be the best you you can be.

Best wishes for great success!

0
Updated Translate

Nadia’s Answer

Additional question: what kind of career do you have in mind? Is it more like a sports manager, a marketing person, PR or rather a coach etc.? If it's the first group, although I haven't worked in the sports industry, I believe it's pretty similar everywhere: what counts is how you are going to "sell" your talent, skills and experience. You may be a latecomer, but if you justify you application in an attractive way, it may actually be your advantage. For example: You are a latecomer, but it's a result of a well thought out decision that presents you as the person who has a strategy for their life. When it comes to coaching; I met a person who did not consider himself as the greatest sports player, but he was an awesome coach. He said that it was because this role was more about the strategy, motivating people and knowing the rules and not having high scores.
If your question is about becoming a professional sports player, I think it varies case by case.

0
Updated Translate

Ron’s Answer

The term "prodigy" only means they are good for their particular age and have potential to be great in the future. It's kind of like not being the tallest in elementary school then by the time you are in high school, you pass everyone. If you have the size to compete and the passion/drive to get better every day, the sky will always be the limit. You can always improve skills, can't teach getting up and wanting to work everyday.

Ron recommends the following next steps:

Find a player you want to be like
Find out what makes them great from others
Find out their routine and story (they may be just like you!)
Dedicate yourself to doing something to get better everyday
Set goals and crush em!

0
Updated Translate

Sophia’s Answer

I work for the production department at ESPN. I have no previous experience as an athlete, but I have experience from college in production and television media. Companies and teams are looking for candidates who can perform the job well. So it is very important to have relevant work experience. If you are working in production, I would try to work/intern/shadow at a local news station or sports team. Just try to get involved in as much as possible. Even if you feel like you're late to the game, start creating content and work towards your goal. Depending on the job you're pursuing, you may need more experience than other jobs. My best advice is to look for professionals who are working your "dream job" and see how they progressed to that point. Use them as a guide to discerning what you need to do. Everyone's path is different, but you can get a good idea from seeing what others have done to get to that point.

0
Updated Translate

Riley’s Answer

Not necessarily! It is definitely best to get into this industry as early as possible because the average retiring age is so young, but it is not a necessity. If you devote your life to practicing your sport and take every opportunity you can, you will definitely have a good chance at pursuing your dreams.

0
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

It's really up to you. Desire, dedication and commitment will allow you to chase your goal. Seek out teachers and mentors. Read, read, read on your subject. Eyes on the objective, not the obstacles. I am thinking now of this statement: "Whether you think you can or can't, you're right."

That's a great quote! I needed to hear that! Thank you. Nievedha P.

0
Updated Translate

Christopher’s Answer

I am guessing that you are really meaning do you need to know someone to get into whatever sports industry you are interested in. Its true that knowing someone or being the child of someone who is very helpful, but if you have the dedication and work ethic to succeed, you can still be successful. A good place to start is being student or graduate assistant at a college. From there you can branch out to different areas. A friend of mine started that way and now he is an assistant coach for a major D-1 college football program. Find an opening and work hard.

Thank you for the great advice! Nievedha P.

0
Updated Translate

Ron’s Answer

The term "prodigy" only means they are good for their particular age and have potential to be great in the future. It's kind of like not being the tallest in elementary school then by the time you are in high school, you pass everyone. If you have the size to compete and the passion/drive to get better every day, the sky will always be the limit. You can always improve skills, can't teach getting up and wanting to work everyday.

Ron recommends the following next steps:

Find a player you want to be like
Find out what makes them great from others
Find out their routine and story (they may be just like you!)
Dedicate yourself to doing something to get better everyday
Set goals and crush em!

Thank you so much for this amazing advice and the checklist! I'll try to incorporate this into my journey Nievedha P.

0
Updated Translate

Maria’s Answer

There are many paths one can take to work in the sports industry. Being a professional athlete (golfer in my case) isn’t the only way to do so. Therefore, I encourage anyone to consider not only being a professional athlete as a way into the sports industry, but explore the many other avenues, including a sports lawyer, manager, support staff, social media creator, or reporter. Each member of my team is essential and a part of my success.

0