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What type of part time seems good enough for a beginner?

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I have some work experience through a program in high school, but never really got a job on my own ever. I'm just curious about what is the best part-time job is there for me. I got a high school diploma and right now going to college. It's summer, and I plan to save up for some money. #job #job-search

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17 answers

John’s Answer

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Kristin, the best place to start your job search is right on campus. There are tons of on-campus part-time job opportunities and, as a student, you’ll automatically be given hiring priority. Check with your school's career office or student employment office for help finding a campus job. If you receive financial aid, also check on jobs available through your campus work-study program.

BENEFITS OF WORKING ON CAMPUS

• The Convenience
• Network, Network, Network
• Helping Your Peers
• Course-Friendly Flexible Hours

Colleges and universities offer thousands of on-campus jobs for students who want to get involved with campus while earning some income. With the rising cost of tuition, many students are turning to part-time jobs to cut some of the cost and work towards paying off loans while still in school. But, balancing academics and work can be tricky. Working on-campus allows for a more convenient alternative, cutting transportation cost and time, and allowing students to make university connections.

LIBRARY MONITOR – If you're worried you won't have enough time to devote to academics, consider working as a study hall or library monitor. Responsibilities generally include the supervision of study spaces to ensure a quiet atmosphere. It's a pretty easy job, but one with lots of downtime, which means you'll have plenty of time to catch up on reading, do homework or study for an exam.

ADMIN ASSISTANT – There are so many different places for a student to work as an admin assistant on campus. You'll likely find these jobs in the academic departments and admissions offices. Some busy professors might also seek personal admin assistants. These jobs probably won’t be very high-paying, but they tend to be low-stress and pretty casual. If you work in an academic department that you’re interested in, you'll have the opportunity to develop some valuable professional connections.

RESIDENTIAL ADVISOR – A residential advisor position is a good option for students who feel comfortable interacting with new people, solving social problems, and serving as part of a support network for their peers. Perks and benefits vary from school to school. You might not get paid in cash, but it’s common for residential advisors to get free housing. In general, working as a residential advisor isn't a huge time commitment.

TEACHING ASSISTANT – Certain departments (most often math and computer science departments) sometimes hire experienced upperclassmen to work as teaching assistants. This is obviously great teaching experience and is a good option for students who are looking for a social, high-responsibility job in a subject that they like. It's also a great way to forge professional connections in your field.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT – Research assistant jobs are great if you want to develop relationships with professors and/or grad students in your department. They're also a good way to explore interests in research and academia. A research assistant job might be very social (i.e. if you’re running research in the social sciences) or pretty solitary (i.e. if you’re working on an independent project in a chem lab). You may also have opportunities to develop very specialized skills, like using particular software programs or running special data analyses. These could serve you well when you apply to jobs in the future, even if they're just interesting things that set you apart from other applicants.

GRADER – With some classes have as many as 500 students enrolled, that's a lot of tests to grade, so professors often employ students within the department to grade tests. Although it's grunt work, the workload is generally spread out based on when the tests are, leaving lots of time in between for academics and extracurricular interests.

MAIL ROOM ASSISTANT – Mail rooms are usually located very close to student dorms, which also makes them conveniently located if you need to run to work after you sleep through your alarm. But there are other benefits to working in the mail room, it's a great way to meet other people on campus, for one. You also may have down time to work on other stuff, like catching up on your reading for classes.

TUTOR – This job may be one of the most lucrative options on this list. The only caveat, Freshmen don’t tend to have a ton of tutoring opportunities (because they’re at the bottom of the academic totem pole). Something to keep in mind as you get older and take more classes, you'll develop more expertise in some particular majors. The more experience you have, the more in demand you'll be, the more money you can make. Because of this, tutoring tends to pay off even more if you stick with it through college (and even after you graduate).

Hope this was Helpful Kristin
Your Welcome Kristen, It was my Pleasure. The real opportunity for success lies within the person and not in the job. John Frick Translate
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Annie’s Answer

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Hello, I suggest restaurant waiter and warehouseman is very good for beginning .

- Warehouseman is very good for the further when you want to open a shop to be a boss you will know more about how to arrange anything .Warehouse is very important part for the store, because if the stock is very well organised, you can find anything immediately .Time make money, don't waist the time that you actually can do very well asap.


- Restaurant waiter you will learn how to do the multitask, because they will have the busy time, and you learn how to make everything smooth and ask them is it the food is good, pay attention to each table in the restaurant, don't let the customer feel no one help, because you will be the customer too when you day off, if you are the customer, I think you also want some good service .
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Adam’s Answer

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Hi Kristin,

I would say a customer facing role is always a great place to start. Whether you a server, cashier, or pharmaceutical technician, you will get great interactions with all sorts of people and learn how to effectively communicate with different demographics. If you have a certain career goal in mind, you could look for jobs that would align with that. Keep logs of interesting interactions you had each day and take notes of what made those successful or challenging. It will be a great way to learn from your experiences and build. You can then review those and take the knowledge you've gained into new roles in the future!

Thanks,

Adam
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Nadia’s Answer

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Unfortunately, in the current situation of COVID-19, it may be quite challenging to find a summer job, especially the one that is both quite well paid and safe.
All above recommendation are great - if you speak any foreign language or are good at Math etc., I would also try to ask my family/relatives/friends if their children need a tutor. I know it's summer, but due to the COVID-19 more children may require additional assistance to be fully up to speed in the upcoming school year. You can post your services online, to avoid direct contact and stay safe.
Good luck!
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Teresa’s Answer

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I think it can be depend on what kind of part time you maybe interest in. There is no rating for a job whether it is good or bad. Every part time job will be a valuable experience for your future.
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Riley’s Answer

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If you are looking to work in your home town before moving to college in the fall, you should definitely check out grocery stores and restaurants! It is pretty easy to be hired in a grocery store as a cashier (especially during the pandemic), and servers in restaurants make a lot of money. Also, while I was in college I worked part-time as a golf caddy at a country club and while this did require me to work every weekend, this job made me a lot of money.

Riley recommends the following next steps:

  • Apply to grocery stores or resturants!
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Hanna’s Answer

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Any job is great experience at this stage. I also recommend looking for work in a café/bar/restaurant - you get to work with people. Otherwise, a supermarket or retail store. As a young person, also think about the working hours - if you want free evenings or weekends, look for a job that accommodates this (depends if you want to work full-time or are just looking at a couple of days per week or weekends). Telesales is also an option, but is not everyone's cup of tea. I personally worked at McDonald's in the summer between high school and university. After that I started looking mainly for work experience in my field of study, but also did a stint in telesales and helping out in a retirement home canteen.
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David’s Answer

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Well, you can find almost any part-time job out there it is just depend on what you want to do as if you are doing to get money or experiences. Getting money it not hard it is like all the job as long as you are not picky this is just because it is part time job. You can do like coffee shop, fast food, delivery, project and etc. As for experiences this is for a career choice that you need to pay more close attention too because this is a job that can help you for the future of your career or keep you at a minimum level, it is also a feel about your future job or career path you are pursing for to see if this is something you will enjoy doing.
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Victoria’s Answer

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Apply for entry level jobs in corporations near you that have tuition assistance or reimbursement programs. Three I can think of off the top of my head are Target, Walmart, Starbucks. Many banking of financial institutions also offer such programs. This will provide good experience for your resume and provide a solid foundation for your future career path.
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Tek Fai’s Answer

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I would recommend you to do a part-time job that you related to your future career (If you know what you wanna do in the future). It is because you can understand more about the career before you start planning your path. For example, you would like to open a restaurant. Then you should go to find a part-time job which is related to restaurant, such as waitress, chief assistant, etc. Then you will see and learn how to operate a restaurant.
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Alexander’s Answer

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My first job was working at a local grocery store. It was a great experience. I started as a cashier and worked my way into other departments such as produce and dairy. It was a great experience in working hard and working with people. You learn to manage your time because in all of the positions I held at the store there was a focus on efficiency and accuracy! From there my next job was working as a bank teller! I've since moved up in the bank to hold numerous jobs as a mortgage lender and a risk analyst!

I hope this helps! Good luck to you.

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Blake’s Answer

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Hey Kristin,

I think anything that would involve interactions with people would be a great start (maybe a restaurant or retail).

Thanks,
Blake
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Yasemin’s Answer

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Hi Kristin! I had a hard time finding a job in high school but in college I worked three jobs! My first was a server, it was definitely a little challenging first but with time I got use to it. My other two jobs were on campus, one was through work-study where I was a front desk assistant and the other as a tutor, beginning my junior year. I would definitely recommend to check out on-campus jobs first especially if you want to coordinate classes easily. It's nice to be close your job! You can check out career services on campus and also see if you qualify for work study; most of the employees on campus are students so there are definitely many opportunities available!

Best of luck!
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Nichole’s Answer

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Unfortunately right now it may be hard to find a job with the Covid-19 going on. I would look at food service that is open for takeout. They may be looking for people to help out and give some employees a break who have been working so hard. Or try a supermarket or large store like Target . They may be the only options right now.
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Lee’s Answer

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I bartender/served while I was going to collage, and I loved it. It is a job that can be flexible with your school schedule. I also enjoy the social interaction with other young people.
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Luis’s Answer

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Hi Kristin!

When looking for a first job, I would suggest that you think about it as a touchpoint in your career! For example, my career path is in HR and when thinking about my first job I thought about what would help me reach that goal or give me experience in that area. My first job was a retail associate that taught me communication skills, policy, etc. Eventually, it helped me reach a lead level within the store to help hire and interview!
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Victoria’s Answer

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Apply for entry level jobs in corporations near you that have tuition assistance or reimbursement programs. Three I can think of off the top of my head are Target, Walmart, Starbucks. Many banking of financial institutions also offer such programs. This will provide good experience for your resume and provide a solid foundation for your future career path.
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