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What are some drawback of being a computer programmer?

I am a sophomore in high school, who is taking college courses for programming right now from a local college. I have been interested in coding since 8th grade and now I feel like that is what my future will be. #computer #programming #computer-programming #computer-software #computer-science #tech #technology #microcomputerapplications #program

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Dave’s Answer

In my experience, moving directly into a programming career (assuming you enjoy programming) can be immensely satisfying and intellectually stimulating. There's enough stuff to learn and practice for several decades and enjoy doing so.

The drawback occurs much further down the road, once you've achieved some level of mastery and start to realize just how big and broad the world is beyond the bits and bytes. You may start to wish you had spent more time in humanities (art, philosophy, etc.) and recognize that they could be significant forces for new ways of thinking and interesting problems to solve.

This doesn't happen to everyone, but it's something you may encounter, particularly if you're the curious type (which many programmers are). My suggestion - and what I wish I had done - is to go broad; take the programming class, but also try that art history class. Look for the overlap, the intersections and the gaps between varied topics. Stretch your mind and you'll be a better programmer and a better human for the experience. :)
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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Bryson,

Computer programming or engineering can be a great profession. It is challenging and you are solving problems every day. You can work in an office or you can work from home, depending on the company. You can work for a software company or in the IT dept. of a large company. You can have exposure to many industries. It's a great foundation for many other careers as well. I started my career as a computer programmer and I liked it quite a bit. I worked in an IT department of a large insurance company. After a few years, I decided that I wanted to try something else, so I moved into project management. I have since done many other things in my career, so computer programming is a great place to start. I would look at colleges that have either a Computer Science or CIS (Computer Information Systems) degree. CS is more engineering focused whereas CIS is more business focused. Good luck in your journey!
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Zahid’s Answer

Here are some things to consider:

The future - As the computers get more powerful, it will be possible to create programs in higher level languages which makes them more reachable for an average person. This can shrink the market for the traditional programmers.

Technology - Even if you have been to university and have a computer degree, by the time you graduate your knowledge is already half way outdated and you need to actively learn to keep yourself useful in the market.

Competition - Considering all the goodness of programming jobs, people from all trades want to work as a programmer. Therefore the competition is kinda tough even though the market is quite good.

Health risks - Our body is not evolved for sitting behind a desk and stare at screen all day.

Brain fatigue - It might be interesting to get new toys (or upgrades) all the time but over a long period it may lead to fatigue.

Communication skills - Too much dealing with computers, may degrade your communication skills.
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Betty’s Answer

Hi Bryson,

Computer programming (software) as a profession typically requires problem solving skills from critical thinking to analysis, troubleshooting, persistence, sound knowledge of coding practices, etc. While there are many positive benefits to the profession, there could also be some major drawbacks depending on the path you take.

While I wouldn't agree with broad generalizations, I think it is important to be aware of the pitfalls of the profession. Programmers are typically characterized as:

- Introverts
- Not great communicators
- Socially awkward
- Have bad hygiene
- Work around the clock
- Very insular focused and not strategic
- Doesn't think of the overall picture

The profession can be beneficial for those who seek to build on and advance their technical careers and make a good living from doing so, but without the management and leadership experience, it could become a dead end. Therefore, it's important and critical in this day and age to also develop the other skills that will help you to advance you to the career and dream job you seek.
Thank you comment icon Thank you!!! Bryson H.
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Chetan’s Answer

There are no drawback of being computer programmer, especially when you have interest in coding.

Only thing is there is no end to learning in this field. You will need keep learning emerging technologies, however, that will be fun to learn.

Take formal degree in this field and then you can join good technology organization where you can utilize your knowledge to solve problems and of course, can have better earning/lifestyle.
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Gerald’s Answer


There aren't too many drawback in Computer Programming especially if you enjoy it.
There are times code debugging can be stressful but for the most part you'll have plenty of help from documentation as well as help from other users on the web. It does require some patience at times but other than that you should try enjoy it and embrace any challenge that comes your as an opportunity to learn more....
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Malathi’s Answer

There is no drawback to being a computer programmer. What you need to be mindful is that you always have the bug picture in mind and what bigger problem you are trying to solve. Look at the problem from a customer / consumer point of view and ensure the requirements are satisfied. Another important aspect is to keep abreast of innovations happening in the programming world, picking the right language for programming. It is very satisfying to be able to solve a critical problem from a few lines of code. Very powerful! Most important aspect is you will continue to learn and grow. You will also see a growth in your career as you move along your path of programming and going on to solve bigger problems.
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Ravi’s Answer

Hi Bryson,

As a Computer Programmer, you always need to challenge your brain. It's all about Logic. You can easily learn the syntax of any programming language. There are so many tutorials available on the web to teach you the syntax of different programming languages.
But You need to learn problem-solving on your own. How efficiently you can solve a given problem. In how many ways, you can solve a given problem.

I will not say it's a drawback but you need to keep on learning the latest technologies available in the market. Learning is a never ending process in the life of a computer programmer. I personally find it interesting.

You also need to learn Time-boxing things. You can't keep on working whole days and nights.

Hope this helps. Good luck with your future.
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Craig’s Answer

It can be a anti-social job, requiring long hours and time spent, also it may not be good for you eyes or posture , health
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Tobin’s Answer

Lately, I have had no down sides to my career as a programmer. Earlier on, I fell victim to what many people do really in their careers - working too much. Really that isn't limited to programming so much as your internal drive to impress others or finish an accomplishment. Learning to balance my work with life helped a lot! As a programmer, I don't fit the stereotypes very well although I am able to go a day or two without much interaction with other people without it bothering me. I can also interact with people constantly and lead them as well. So, if getting assignments that can be challenging to solve/complete and working to see it happen is appealing to you then you are probably on the right path.
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Dave’s Answer

I've been a programmer for a number of years. Overall I've found the career very challenging and rewarding.

As for drawbacks, there's an enormous amount of pressure to learn the latest and greatest. There's a number of jobs that have the expectation you'll spend your time outside of work learning new technologies or solve work problems in your own time. This is especially true when you're early in your career and see just how much there is to learn. My advice is to make sure you find a job that promotes a healthy work-life balance. Find some hobbies that you enjoy and take time outside of work to invest in those!

I've also found that early in my career you'll likely not get the kind of career growth you may want by staying at one job. The market is heavily incentivized for you to switch jobs every few years. This is stressful, but can help you grow your salary and other benefits much more quickly than if you remained in one place for several years.

Those are a few that jump to the top of my mind. Good luck in whatever you decide to pursue!

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Matt’s Answer

If you offered a time machine to most of my friends they would have studied programming in college rather than what the initially majored in. Its a fantastic career that is not only high paying, but also allows you to creatively solve problems (you would be surprised how many jobs do not offer that). Worst case scenario as a programmer you don't love going to work every day but you make enough money to enjoy your life outside of work!
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Samuel’s Answer

Hi Bryson! Great to hear that you have had a passion to learn about coding and have pursued it for so long. I highly recommend you continue to pursue that passion and develop it more and more, as it will be an essential asset to you in the future.

With that said, I think one of the major drawbacks to computer programming, especially as a new graduate, is the application process. Other majors and careers have certifications that are required, that can definitely set you apart from the rest, but with becoming a programmer, there's a lot of competition with no "official" way to differentiate yourself. Networking is key, but it's difficult to network if you are just starting out. With the large influx of people interested in the field, competition is pretty fierce. The interview process is very difficult, especially for the larger companies that everyone wants to work for. For each interview that you get after an application, imagine that you have to basically study for a final exam on everything you've ever learned in your 4 or so years at university. But it's not written, it's reviewed on a live basis by a panel in front of you. It can be very stressful trying to prepare for these and it's often difficult to deal with rejection.

I highly recommend getting as much experience as you can as early as you can. Any hackathons or side projects that you can manage outside of your coursework would be a great benefit in order to set your resume apart from the rest.

Another drawback for being a computer programmer is not only the competition in the application process, but also the competition in the career advancement process. Again due to the large amount of people flooding into the field, larger companies are always looking for the cutting edge. It's not always just free food from the cafeteria and napping rooms that the tech company provides, but it can be pretty stressful to meet deadlines. Some find it difficult to maintain a work life balance as a result.
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