Skip to main content
2 answers
4
Asked 1378 views

what are the worst and best parts of being a biochemical engineer

I'm looking to start a career in biochemical engineering and I'd like to be mentally prepared for any unexpected hardships.

#biology #biomedical-engineering #biochemical #chemical #engineering #engineer #chemical-engineering #chemical-engineer #civil-engineering

Thank you comment icon If you haven’t gotten your degree yet be prepared to work very hard in college. Engineering degrees are very rigorous. You will not be able to party like your liberal arts classmates. You will however have a well paying career when you graduate. Michael Trocchia

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

2 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sarah’s Answer

The breadth of roles associated with this major is large and as such the pros and cons will differ. I work for a large medical technology company and we use biochemists in many different areas like product design, process design (manufacturing), research and technology, product analysis and quality engineering. The day-to-day activities for these roles will vary greatly.
In general, if you're working for a biomedical firm a common downside is the compliance documentation associated with the role, the long regulatory approval timelines for new products and the rigors to ensure the highest level of quality. However the upside is working on cutting edge technology, partnering with incredibly talented peers and ultimately that you are creating technology that improves people's lives.

Sarah recommends the following next steps:

Explore what type of roles you may be interested in. Simple Google searches can provide a lot of information and help you sort through this efficiently.
If you find areas of interest, ask another question here about the specific area and we can provide more information about what the day-to-day work is like.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Adam’s Answer

The best parts of being an engineer in general is applying the skills and techniques learned through schooling and hands on work experience to solve problems and provide short or long term solutions that benefit the longevity of processes. Biochemical engineers have an extra edge of biology knowledge that opens the door to be a key player in biological products for waste treatment, medicinal research, bioremediation, military advancements, pharmaceuticals, and many other fields.

Right now is a great time to specialize in biochemical engineering or biochemistry as the health/wellness and technology fields are merging together more and more to re-think and revolutionize medicine, food and therapeutics. A career in the medical research, nutritional research, or biological technology development realms would be optimal areas to pursue with a formative biochemical background. In addition, pursuing a similar path chemical engineers take would also be applicable for biochemical engineers as the curriculums at most universities expose you to the same engineering classes. The difference is having more of a focus on Biology based courses which adds an extra layer of knowledge to maneuver your career with.

Both Chemical and Biochemical engineering fields provide an expanded array of career areas to venture into which aids in the calm of knowing you'll always be in demand and as the world evolves, so does chemistry and biology. Here are some high level Pros and Cons of Biochemical engineering:
Pros
1) Various industries (manufacturing, analytical development, product development, educational development)
2) Lucrative career opportunities (higher than average salaries overtime once established)
3) Various career settings to choose from (laboratory, universities, research)
4) Specialize in many areas (biochemistry, chemical engineering, instrumentation, biotech)
5) Job security
6) Abreast to new advancements in biology and applications

Cons
1) Rigorous undergraduate curriculum (lots of studying and focus)
2) Career promotion advancement may require graduate degree or further certification beyond a Bachelors degree
3) Currently the field is small so limited specialized roles available to pursue (though expected to change in the next 5-10 years)
4) Exposure to hazardous materials
0