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How to you choose what to major in?

If i want to do something medical should i choose a science class like biology? Or if I want to go to law school should i simply choose law or something like that?

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Michel’s Answer

The beauty of medical school is the broadness of degrees that they accept. I personally majored in Biology and my significant other majored in Nursing. Both will be going to MD school. I have friends in class that majored in chemistry, physics, art, teaching. The only requirements are taking the MCAT which is the pre medical school exam, and having the classes that they require in order to matriculate. These classes typically include a year of math, gen chem, organic chem, physics, biology, psychology, and sociology. The reason you see so many people doing Biology is one Biology teaches a lot about human body physiology and anatomy, and two it covers all of these basic classes that will be required. Great question and let me know if you have any more.
Thank you comment icon I'm excited to put your great advice to good use! b
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Paul’s Answer

I would choose a subject that you enjoy, and that provides a general knowledge of various subjects, and helps to develop your writing, critical and analytical thinking skills.

There are really to major requirements to get into law school. I have seen pre-med majors decide not to go to medical school, and then enroll in law school. The same for medical school. The development of general science knowledge, and other requirements for admission, seems to yield successful results.

It is said that general knowledge individuals rule the world. I suppose this can be said about many people who work in the legal profession. In my opinion, to reach your future goals, the development of writing, communications, and other skills will be needed to achieve success.
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Warren’s Answer

I agree with Missy's Answer - If you want longevity in a career you have to be passionate about it - If you cant' figure it out try getting some opportunities to "shadow" or Volunteer or Intern in the areas of interest to be more deeply immersed and involved and you will figure out where your passion is...
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! b
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Nyeesha’s Answer

I would take a general course that gives information about different fields to see which one you like best.
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Nicholas’s Answer

My first bit of advice is to place focus on your Gen Ed requirements. Get them done and do them well. You are truly in the exploration phase and that's ok. Both Biology and Political Science count for Gen Eds in most colleges and universities. Schedule office time with those professors and have questions ready to learn more about their perspectives and career paths. I would also get involved in some student groups on campus and see where that journey takes you. You can learn about your own path by connecting with others.
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Ann’s Answer

First, go with whatever really interests you the most. Passion for what you do is important. Here are a few links to get you started:

https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/pre-law-majors/

https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/finding-a-job/degree-for-medical-school
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. b
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Han-Bee’s Answer

Hey there, B! Thanks for popping in with an insightful question. It's absolutely fine for you to kick-start a major that aligns with your interests, and don't worry, you're completely free to switch your major whenever you feel like it.

But, I'd suggest you consider one or both of these steps to guide you along the way:

1. If there's a specific college you've got your eye on, I highly recommend to get in touch with their academic advising center. They're there to help potential students like you. Share with them the careers you're considering and they should be able to guide you towards suitable majors/minors, and even recommend some classes you might want to take.

2. Another good idea is to connect with professionals who are already working in the career field you're interested in. LinkedIn is a great place to do this. Set up an informational interview with them, and ask which majors they'd suggest for success in the field, how much education you'll need, and what skills you should be honing. This blog post might come in handy for conducting successful informational interviews: https://cla.umn.edu/undergraduate-students/career-services/getting-job-or-internship/informational-interviews

It gives you tips on finding professionals, reaching out to them, what questions to ask, and how to keep up a relationship with them.

You've got this, B!

Han-Bee recommends the following next steps:

Meet with an academic advisor.
Research more about informational interviews.
Create a LinkedIn account and explore.
Reach out to professionals and conduct an informational interview.
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Joshua’s Answer

Discover a profession that not only provides a good income but also brings you joy! It's crucial to consider the balance between the cost of your education and the potential earnings once you've completed your degree. Always remember, your happiness is equally important as your income!
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Yvette’s Answer

I've always found the best approach to deciding what you'd like to focus on is to take a variety of classes and see which subject you 1) naturally gravitate towards and find the most interesting as well as 2) enjoy the most! I think this will typically come to you after you've explored a few subjects, particularly in university, and it's easy enough to switch majors in your first 2 years.

Personally, I began university as a Biology major, took a few required courses, and realized biology wasn't for me and I was actually much more interested in and passionate about Psychology. I soon changed my major and the rest is history!

Bottom line, don't put too much pressure on yourself to figure out what exactly you should do. You have time, so take it and figure out what it is you love the most. Best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Yvette! b
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Doctorate Student’s Answer

Greetings. Both great career options by the way! Just as long as you do what you love, everything will fall into place. To save time & money, begin with General Education classes at a Community College (most tuition free). This will also give a sense of what classes are interesting. You may speak with a college/career counselor as this might be helpful. Good luck and best wishes!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. b
Thank you comment icon You are very welcome. Glad to be of help! Doctorate Student -
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Ujjwal’s Answer

If it is medical, you start with biology in school. Typically they won't teach "Law" in high-school, but you can take up subjects like pol-science etc.
Unlike medical, where it will be frowned upon if you do not have biology as a basic subject when you apply in medical, law will not have that distinction.
Ultimately it is important that you study what you enjoy and choose a career in that; so make a decision accordingly.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing your perspective. b
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PwC’s Answer

Research both fields to get a feel of which area resonate with your values. At the end of the day, a career should be a lifestyle, not a job.
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! b
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PwC’s Answer

Take as many entry level classes in the fields that interest you and reach out to older students or professors on what everyday in that career would look like.
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PwC’s Answer

Depending on your medical or law interests you can take classes based on each for credit and see which one you enjoy more. Reach out to academic advisors and get in touch with professionals to gain greater insights.
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Alan’s Answer

Yes, that would be the way to start, and advisors in those fields will certainly help you. In each discipline there is a sequence of courses leading to preparation for the next step in reaching your career goal. If it's law, you'd probably be starting with political science courses, an elective or two of which will likely deal with the law. You'd also be taking courses that help you develop the skills you need, like writing, research, public speaking, etc. Certainly if the medical profession interests you, biology and anatomy would be part of equation. Most of your focused course work for those two professions will be in graduate school, so in college start with the required skills courses that will translate to anything, filling your schedule with, maybe, a class relevant to each of the above, so you'll start to get a sense of which path appeals to you more.
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Pamela’s Answer

When selecting a major be sure to align with your future self, long term not based upon your present beliefs. Select a major/career path that you have a passion for and see yourself thriving in. Life is forever evolving and so are major's/career paths.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! b