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why did you go to college?

why did you go to college? what did you major in? what were the best and worst parts?

Thank you comment icon I was in the US Navy - I went to college to learn even more about computers for my career. The US Navy was the best place to have immediate hands on working without job experience. I majored in Computer Science. Best part is learning what you are most interested in once past the general Math, Writing classes then you get into selecting your Major and hope what you have a passion in doing Anthony

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Paul’s Answer

I went to college because I felt that my high school education was very inadequate for the goals that I wanted to achieve in life. I wanted to learn how to be self sufficient and get a job that would earn wages over the long term, and allow me to invest in monetary investments, to enable me to retire and not live in poverty.

I went also, because I knew society was advancing, and I would need to learn about the new technology and keep up to date with these advances. Yes, making transitions from high school to college can be challenging, but I learned to adapt and evolve, as a person, and persisted until graduation.
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Megan’s Answer

My motivation to go to college was to get out of my house.

I wanted to get out of my small town, away from being the middle of 5 kids, and to be on my own and meet new people.
The irony of this is that my parents made me live at home for two years and go to community college to save money. Which it did save me money.

Mainly I had 3 goals for college
1. To be a student-athlete and run track and cross-country
2. To do the Disney College Program
3. To Study Abroad

I had no idea what I wanted to do career-wise but I was very interested in the college experience and exploring my options. I did reach all 3 goals and felt like I had a really great college experience even though I made mistakes-
I failed a class first semester
I transferred schools 3 times
Changed my major 4 times
Took on way too much student loan debt

But I also
worked on campus which was what led to my career
did 4 internships- 2 during college and 2 after gradauting
studied abroad in a program that is only offered in 2 universities in the country
participated in alternative breaks in New York at a horse center
was a college athlete for two years and played rec sports for 2 years
met my best friend and my husband during college

Even though I do not feel I made the best choices in degrees and cost of school- I in no way regret my experience and am happy I did get the opportunity to go to college.
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Patrick’s Answer

Hey there, Cody!

You know, I ended up going to college mainly because I felt like I didn't have many other options. It seemed like the whole world was telling me that a college degree was the only ticket to a good life. So, I decided on Journalism as my major, with dreams of becoming a Sports Journalist. But, as fate would have it, I discovered that Journalism wasn't really my cup of tea once I was in college. So, I switched gears and chose Business instead, which eventually led me to a career in the corporate world.

Looking back, I can say that my college years were some of the most memorable and enriching times of my life. I made some lifelong friends, broadened my horizons, and became a more well-rounded and knowledgeable individual. But, I do sometimes wish that there were more alternatives to college, like trade schools, presented to me back then.

However, I'm grateful for my college experience. In today's world, it seems like having just a high school diploma leaves you a step behind everyone else. It's become almost a norm to have some form of higher education, be it college or trade school. So, I'm glad I took the college route, even though it wasn't my only choice.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Many students have similar question.
There are many reasons to enter the college.
1. For some professional careers, e.g. accountant, engineer, doctor, lawyer, etc. it requires a college degree to become certified. Apart from entering the college, attending vocation training school is also another option.
2. Entering the college, you can learn not only college, the college also trains your critical thinking and analysis skills. These skills are vital in your lifetime.
3. You can participate different curriculum activities and gain the experience to organize these activities
4. You can also established good people network in the college. This will become your valuable asset in the future
My college days is one of the most remarkable moments in my life.
Hope you can enjoy the college days! Good Luck!
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Joseph’s Answer

I felt to make myself marketable college was the best opportunity. Changed majors during my time as my interest changed. Information Systems. The best part of college was the people and friends including relationship with teachers. Worst part was the loneliness at the beginning until I started to meet people and gain trust. Overall, my best time in college were the 2 yrs in my first school in which I was kicked out for partying too much. BUT I matured and learned a lot. Never stopped going and eventually graduated from 2 other universities and have had a great career in computers.
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Jerome’s Answer

I grew up in West Oakland and education always felt like the path to providing a better life for myself and my family. Majored in Psychology, Philosophy and Business (BA, BA and MBA).

Best parts were some of the classes and the environment (went to SF State and Loved It). I didn’t know many people and I was/am introverted, so building relationships was a little stressful.
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Claxton’s Answer

Hi, Cody. I originally went to college because I wanted to be a civil engineer. Because I could not get through the final required math class in the major - Differential Equations - I ended up switching majors, to communication, concentrating in mass communication (radio and television). That's what I earned my degree in, but I only worked in that field for one year with a small video production company and advertising agency before I moved into financial services. My current job combines aspects of engineering, communication, and graphic design in order to create new business forms and revise existing form.

The best part about my college experience was, and still is, the many great people that I met, including fellow students and faculty members who taught me a great deal. I still keep in touch with quite a few of my college classmates. The worse part of it, besides not getting a degree in civil engineering, may seem a bit odd. At the college I went to, there was a requirement that everyone either demonstrate that they could swim or take Beginning Swimming. My experience with that class was not positive, and I haven't swam since completing that class.

I hope that you find a major that interests you and that your college experience is a positive one.
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Martha’s Answer

These are great questions, Cody! Here's my perspective:
- I went to college for several reasons. I love learning and wanted the advanced education. My college had a particular program that would support my professional aspirations (which, by the way, have gone through many twists and turns). I wanted the on-campus experience for my maturity and confidence. I wanted to meet and learn from people of varying backgrounds. I achieved all of these and still think fondly of that time.
- I majored in public policy analysis. I use the content/knowledge as a voter and member of my community. I use the skills - analysis, critical thinking, writing, speaking - in my work.
- The best parts were all the different subjects I explored, the challenges I met such as writing a thesis, the broadening of my idea of the possible, and the friends I made. Also, I loved the campus and still do. The worst parts were the pressure before tests or paper deadlines and feeling inadequate next to the extraordinary people I met.

You may - and likely do - have different reasons or expectations and that is fine. I hope my thoughts help. Good luck!
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Kim’s Answer

Hey there, Cody! You've really come up with some thought-provoking questions.

Why did I decide to attend college, you ask? Well, I had my sights set on college because I was aware that to land a job that was not only fulfilling but also well-matched with my skills, I would need a degree. Plus, it would give me the means to support myself and my loved ones.

As for my major, I chose to delve into the world of business management.

Now, onto the highs and lows of my college journey. Let's tackle the tough parts first. Being away from my family was a real challenge. They mean the world to me, and it was tough missing out on family moments. Another hurdle was learning to be my own cheerleader and ensuring I made it to class each day. Freedom is fantastic, but it requires solid time management skills.

On the brighter side, one of the highlights of my college life was the chance to meet a diverse group of people. In fact, I met my best friend during those years. Now, our families are intertwined, with our kids growing up as close as cousins.

In my opinion, college is an essential stepping stone for young adults today. Securing a rewarding career without some form of higher education beyond high school can be quite a challenge. Wishing you all the very best on your journey!
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Alan’s Answer

Cody, I went to college because that's what was expected in my family and culture. It was simply the continuation of my education, which is even more true now. I was very young, and went in thinking I'd do something with math, either a statistician (because I liked baseball statistics) or an accountant (like my mother). But two things happened. One, calculus kicked my a**. It really was more the teacher than me, because I did pick it up with tutoring, but, still, my interest in math had been soured. More importantly, I was changing. And the events around me, it being 1967-1968, were forcing me to change, becoming more interested in people and the world around me than in numbers. I ended up majoring in Political Science, basically to argue politics (which I still do), because that was not only my new interest, but my new calling. But that didn't lead toward a career, and I graduated college (I'm skipping a lot of stuff) needing to get a job job, which I did and which lasted a couple of years. I had for many years had a vague idea that I wanted to be a teacher, but wasn't sure what that meant specifically for me. I was referred for an apprenticeship program, which wet my appetite, and led me to graduate school. I was lucky that the time and my situation allowed me to change directions. Not everyone can, but the option should always be remembered by those who can and are trying to decide what they want to do with their lives.

The best parts of college for me were the people I met and the inspirations I received, in and, in my case, out of the classroom. I later became a college professor and advisor, and believe I made a difference for a lot of young people looking for direction. I hope something in all of this helped you with the answers you're looking for.
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Alan’s Answer

Cody, I went to college because that's what was expected in my family and culture. It was simply the continuation of my education, which is even more true now. I was very young, and went in thinking I'd do something with math, either a statistician (because I liked baseball statistics) or an accountant (like my mother). But two things happened. One, calculus kicked my a**. It really was more the teacher than me, because I did pick it up with tutoring, but, still, my interest in math had been soured. More importantly, I was changing. And the events around me, it being 1967-1968, were forcing me to change, becoming more interested in people and the world around me than in numbers. I ended up majoring in Political Science, basically to argue politics, because that was not only my new interest, but my new calling. But that didn't lead toward a career, and I graduated college (I'm skipping a lot of stuff) needing to get a job job, which I did and which lasted a couple of years. I had for many years had a vague idea that I wanted to be a teacher, but wasn't sure what that meant specifically for me. I was referred for an apprenticeship program, which wet my appetite, and led me to graduate school. I was lucky that the time and my situation allowed me to change directions. Not everyone can, but the option should always be remembered by those who can and are trying to decide what they want to do with their lives.

The best parts of college for me were the people I met and the inspirations I received, in and, in my case, out of the classroom. I later became a college professor and advisor, and believe I made a difference for a lot of young people looking for direction. I hope something in all of this helped you with the answers you're looking for.
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Xiaojie Johan’s Answer

Hello Cody,

Thanks for posing the question. A lot of my classmates have asked this when I was younger before I was in my undergraduate studies. In my opinion, the answer varies, but for me, it was almost a rite of passage. As almost everyone in my family went to college, it was expected of me to at least finish undergraduate studies, if not graduate school like a Master's degree, a PhD or a MD. It was natural for me to go to college as it also provided me with an advanced foundation on whatever career I chose to pursue. (I'm a consultant right now.)

At my undergraduate institution, I chose to go to their business school, specializing in Management Information Systems. Looking back, I was definitely interested in it, but it wasn't my favorite subject. I changed subjects for graduate school and pursued graduate studies in Economics. I also took some math and programming classes. I think my education has given a solid foundation to pursue a career in Consulting and other Business occupations. I definitely have a good grasp on at least the basics that's necessary in these fields.

Just some advice: When you are choosing what path you want to pursue, think carefully what you want to pursue in your degree studies. It doesn't necessarily have to be what you love, but it should give you a solid foundation on what you want to pursue in your long-term career plan.

Hopefully this helps!

Best regards,

Johan
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deborah’s Answer

Hello Cody! I appreciate your question.

For my undergraduate degree, I pursued my passion of art and design. College was challenging in a good way, I met lifelong friends, and I was able to "come into my one" as a young person. I don't have any real "bad" parts in my college experience. It was a lot of work and time, but very worth it. Going full-time in college is like a working in full-time job.

After college, I worked in advertising. It gave me experience and exposure to additional career options. In order to change to a career in marketing management, I had to go back to school and get my master of business administration (MBA) to change my career path. It was lots of long days and nights of studying. I also worked part-time. But, I would do it all over again.

I teach college now. I advise my students to enjoy the journey of learning. And, when you choose your college major, you are choosing a starting point (not an end point) in your career. And, you can change your mind if you start your college studies and decide it is not for you.

I hope my answer is useful to you. Good luck!
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