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Can you get an associate's degree in one subject and a bachelor's in another?

I am an aspiring LCSW in sophomore year. I am taking my associates in college this year, but I don't know if I should major in Psychology and English or Sociology and English (I have to take a college class for English, but It was also recommended that I take another dual college class as well). In college I want to major in Sociology, and I was wondering that if I were to take a Psychology class would it look perplexing on my College application.

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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Summer !

Guess what ? You are on the right track in what you're considering !

You can major in Sociology and minor in English or Psychology for the Associates - your choice. I agree with the English because you will be doing a lot of report writing as a Licensed Certified Social Worker. The reports need to be written clearly and with details, so English will benefit you. For your Bachelors degree, you should major in Social Work and you can minor in Psychology. My sister did a combination of an Associates in Sociology and a Bachelors in Psychology and a Masters in Social Work.

Another suggestion is to get an Associates in Psychology and a Bachelors in Social Work and a Masters in Social Work. So, yes, you can get an Associates degree in one subject and a Bachelors degree in a different subject, but consider how prepared you may want to be. Most LCSWs are doing clinical therapy work now, so you'll want a strong foundation in psychology for the theories and techniques and knowledge of human behavior. You'll need a strong understanding of Sociology, too, because you will have a vast array of clients with so many different backgrounds. You'll need to understand the cultural, spiritual, familial and regional attributes of many different individuals. So with all of this advice, I would highly suggest the Associates in Psychology and the Bachelors and Masters in Social Work.

Although minoring in English would be admirable and useful, consider just taking a couple of English courses as an elective and the general education fulfillment. You should also fit in a Public Speaking class, too. Hopefully such courses will fill your general ed degree requirements to graduate. But you're going to need the intensive of both Psychology and Sociology the most.

Having a degree in Psychology would look appropriate and expected for applying to a Social Work program, not perplexing as you've stated. As you progress in college, you will have exact guidance of what is required in your state and you will pick up along the way of what to do step by step.

I hope that this has been a help and I wish you the best !
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Summer
Thank you comment icon You are very welcome, Summer ! Michelle M.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Summer,

Can you get an associate’s degree in one subject and a bachelor’s in another?

Yes, it is possible to earn an associate’s degree in one subject and a bachelor’s degree in another. This approach can provide a diverse educational background and open up various career opportunities. When pursuing this path, it’s important to carefully plan your course selections to ensure that the credits earned for the associate’s degree will transfer and count towards the bachelor’s degree program.

Choosing Majors for Associate’s and Bachelor’s Degrees

When deciding on majors for your associate’s and bachelor’s degrees, it’s essential to consider your long-term career goals. In your case, as an aspiring Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), you may want to choose majors that align with the field of social work and counseling. Psychology, sociology, and English are all relevant areas of study for individuals pursuing careers in social work.

Relevance to Social Work

Psychology is highly relevant to the field of social work as it provides an understanding of human behavior, mental health, and emotional well-being. Sociology offers insights into societal structures, group dynamics, and social issues, which are integral to the practice of social work. English courses can enhance communication skills, critical thinking, and writing abilities, all of which are valuable in the field of social work.

Considerations for College Applications

When applying to colleges for your bachelor’s degree program, it’s important to showcase a well-rounded academic background. Taking classes in psychology or sociology during your associate’s degree program can demonstrate your interest and commitment to the field of social work. Admissions committees often value applicants who have explored multiple disciplines and have a strong foundation in liberal arts education.

Transferring Credits

Before enrolling in courses for your associate’s degree, it’s advisable to consult with academic advisors at both your current institution and the college where you plan to pursue your bachelor’s degree. This will help ensure that the credits you earn for your associate’s degree will transfer smoothly and fulfill any prerequisite or general education requirements for your chosen bachelor’s degree program.

In conclusion, pursuing an associate’s degree in one subject and a bachelor’s degree in another is feasible, especially when aligning the coursework with your career aspirations. Choosing majors that complement each other and support your long-term goals can provide a well-rounded educational foundation.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

The College Board: The College Board is a reputable source for information on college admissions, transfer credits, and academic planning.
American Psychological Association (APA): The APA provides valuable insights into the relevance of psychology coursework for individuals pursuing careers in social work.
American Sociological Association (ASA): The ASA offers resources that highlight the connections between sociology education and professions such as social work.

These sources were utilized to ensure accurate and reliable information regarding academic pathways and their relevance to career goals.

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Aaron’s Answer

Absolutely! Associate degrees are 2 year degrees awarded at Community/Junior Colleges. Your first 2 years of college are considered general education meaning they are not specific to any 4 year degree program. What that means for you is no matter if you want a Bachelors (4 year degree) in English or Engineering that 2 year degree will cover the 1st 2 years of your 4 year program. Just a little nugget, Community colleges are a great way to start your degree program. If you prefer smaller classes, a smaller campus and lets not forget a dramatically less expensive experience they are awesome.
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Joseph’s Answer

Of course. I have an Associate Degree in Computer Science and BS in Management Information Systems.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Summer
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Jerome’s Answer

I have an Associates Degree in Arts, Bachelors Degree in Psychology and an MBA in Business. Mixing and matching is certainly something you can do!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Summer
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Angela’s Answer

Hello there,

Absolutely, I hold an Associate's Degree in Interior Design. In addition, I also have several certifications, primarily in finance, which is my current field of work. I'm in the process of completing a Bachelor's in Business. Remember, everything is achievable. Life is not a straight path, and it's never too late to change course. If something sparks your interest more, don't hesitate to explore it. You have the power to shape your journey.
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Summer
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Xiaojie Johan’s Answer

Hello Summer,

I don't think it will be a problem for transfers, especially if you're transferring to certain schools. I've known a few people that have transferred successfully and have changed their majors during their studies at a 4 year undergraduate institution. This is more common than you think!

Hopefully this helps!

Best of luck with your studies!

Best regards,

Johan
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Summer
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A. Michelle’s Answer

Hi Summer - It shouldn’t be a problem to major in one subject in community college and a different one at a four-year school. Just make sure you are aware of any prerequisites for the major at the four-year, so that you are covering them during your time at community college. As another poster stated, English will be useful in social work - or other fields - but you might want to limit your coursework in the subject to ensure that you are taking all of the psych, sociology or other courses required for your bachelor’s degree. All the best to you!
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Summer
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Ava’s Answer

Hi Summer!

I think it's great that you're weighing your options. I have an associate's in animation & game art, and soon I'll be graduating with a bachelor's in software engineering! If you are passionate about both, and have support (financial, time, etc.) to do both, you absolutely should! The work I do now centers around teaching creative coding, so it was a perfect fit for me. It also led me to discovering computer graphics and game development as a potential career path.

One thing to consider is that because they are two different degrees, they will require different courses. Go to your college's website and find the full course lists for your ideal majors. Compare them, and try to match the classes they have in common. Added plus, try to find the course descriptions. What jobs/industries are you interested in, and what education do they typically ask for? This will help you narrow down your options and avoid taking extra classes that maybe don't really align with your goals.

Remember that many careers are linked, and having a strongly unified, yet diverse skillset, looks great on a resume! Best of luck Summer!
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