Skip to main content
10 answers
10
Asked 1012 views

If you had another chance, what would you change?

When talking about college, I always hear people say "I wish I would have. . ." or "I probably should have. . ."

I'd like to get the most out of my time in college and not waste a single minute. If you had another chance, what would you change?

#college #college-advice #career-advice #advice

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

10

10 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

Kyle,


Universities are incredible resources for academic learning, but equally for personal and professional growth. I think the bulk of people who feel like they "missed out" in college, say that they did not take advantage of all the social opportunities, networking opportunities, and opportunities for personal and professional growth. I personally wish I would have made more of an effort to go to the free talks on campus, joined more groups or participated in more activities. It is easy to get very focused on grades and learning, which in my opinion is only half of what the college experience offers. The best employees I see are those who are well rounded. Not just smart, or just hard working or good at networking. In college you have the chance to grow a network, learn new ideas from new people, and become well rounded outside of the classroom.

Thank you comment icon John - Thank you for your answer. We need more advice like this, now more than ever! There are more than 1k unanswered questions on CV right now. Hoping you'll answer a few more this week! Jordan Rivera, Admin COACH
2
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Simeon’s Answer

If I could have changed anything, I would have tried to do a better job of keeping up with people that I knew from undergraduate school. I probably would have had more career options if I had tried to keep up with them on Linkedin or some other site. The people that you know open a lot of doors for which companies you have a shot of working at.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Gloria’s Answer

Hi Kyle,
I would say that I would have gone to community college in my hometown at the beginning of my time in college. It would have saved me money in the long run since most of the core classes were cheaper at a community college rather than a major university. Also, it would have allowed me to get used to college before moving away for school. I was challenged by homesickness and a new state where I didn't know anyone. It was difficult for me to adapt. I lost track of what I wanted.

Secondarily, I would be more relaxed about my major. I chose my major too soon and I ended up changing it several times. Because I didn't stay engaged, I stopped going to school for a while. It ended up taking me 17 years to get my bachelor's degree.

Gloria
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Lodema’s Answer

Finish college before starting your career. I was bypassed for a promotion because I did not. I went back to college while working full-time and with two young kids. Don't let this happen to you.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rachel’s Answer

You should start college planning to study every day. Attend your classes. Do the homework. When you find a class difficult, attend office hours early in the semester. If you continue to struggle, get a tutor.

Taking the initiative to get good grades early will spare you hours of worry and anxiety later.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sven-Oliver’s Answer

As this is not a U.S. specific question, I feel entitled to reply too.

I think you know, you can't go back in time and if you could, the next question would be, how far would you go back in order to start over? Always assuming, you could take all your knowledge and experience with you.

If you don't want to feel sorrow to have chosen the wrong path in the future, then you should consider two things.

1. I see so many people, being almost 40 years old, being unhappy with their profession and recognizing, they did what their parents expected them to do.

2. When choosing my own 'calling' it was helpful to imagine I'm a billionaire who already visited all the interesting places in the world. After having a long sleep and being served breakfast by my butler on my motor yacht, what would I do with the rest of the day? One of my answers was 'Make computers talk to each other.'

Now I'm 50 years old and I still like doing what I do. I'd do it, even if I wouldn't get payed! But: I' like doing what I do. As I like what I do, I'm doing it good. As I'm doing it good, I get paid. Lo and behold! Two problems solved. :-) First, make sure I like what I do, second make a living.

Greetings from Germany.

Sven-Oliver recommends the following next steps:

Imagine you are a billionaire already.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Richard’s Answer

Good grades are important. Go to class. Plan to spend 2-3 hours studying for every hour of lecture. Attend your professor's office hours and any TA review sessions. If there is a test bank, use that as a study tool to understand what your professor wants you to focus on for the test.

Treat school like a job. Get up early, get to work and when your work is done at the end of the day, you can spend time on social life or organizations.

But don't take life too seriously. You will have plenty of time to worry when you are older.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jayda’s Answer

Awesome question, Kyle! Reach out to your advisors and connect with professors to ask questions about what the day-to-day looks like in the position you're aiming for when you graduate. They may have connections to put you in contact with, that can shed more light. The more you can learn about your field and desired role before jumping in, the better! :)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Geoconda’s Answer

I would have more balance throughout my life. I went to college on a scholarship and was so scared of losing it that mainly just studied to get As. However, I feel I missed out on other college experiences: fraternities, parties. networking in general. College and life in general is about more than accomplishing goals, it is about the joy you find just spending time with fiends and family. Remember that, try to find a balance between working hard and having fun.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jacob’s Answer

Hi, Kyle,


That is a tremendous question. When I look back at my college experience, there are a number of things I would have changed. They all boil down to this: I wish I would have chosen a major based on what career I ultimately wanted to pursue. I was very pragmatic when I selected my major in terms of pursuing a field with a good chance of post graduate employment and solid compensation prospects. I didn't do a very good job of gauging how interested I would be in that discipline for the long term, though. Recently, a friend recommended I check out a career guide he had stumbled across. I really wish I had read it before I went to college. I linked it below. It's lengthy, but absolutely worth the read. It takes a very unique perspective on a variety of topics. I'm confident you will find it interesting and rewarding.


I hope it helps. Good luck!

Jacob recommends the following next steps:

https://80000hours.org/career-guide/job-satisfaction/
0