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Can I pursue a Master's in Engineering after completing an undergraduate degree in Physics ? If so , which fields of engineering are applicable ?


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Stephanie A.’s Answer

Hi Raphael,
I have a BS in Physics and went to grad school for an MSEE. Either mechanical or electrical engineering with have lots of overlap. What I found was that I had to take several undergrad EE classes before the graduate classes. They were essentially repeats so paying for credits wasn't fun, but the classes were much easier. I was working in optics so I was able to take solid-state physics classes which made me happy.

A key benefit of getting an engineering masters is the value it holds. In physics, you really need to get a PhD for good job prospects. Think about what type of industry you want to work in. You may find a company that will sponsor your graduate work.

Lots of luck!

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Peter’s Answer

The answer to your Questions is: Of course you can! My career path is a good example

I graduated with a degree in Molecular Biology/Biochemistry. I worked for two years in a Microbiology Lab before going on to Graduate School. I had become very interested in the Field of Water Resources. So I attended the Civil Engineering Dept. at the University of Washington and got a Masters Degree in Engineering. I then worked nearly my entire career with various national consulting firms. About ten years into my career I took and passed the Engineer-in-Training (EIT) test, which is typically taken by engineering student in their junior or senior year. Shortly after that I passed the Professional Engineering exam and got my PE License. I have been very happy with my decision to pursue an engineering career as it has been a source of great personal satisfaction and success in my Life.

Most engineering disciplines are based upon Physics. So your College Degree places you in an excellent position to pursue an engineering graduate degree. A Physics Degree will give you a good grounding for civil, mechanical, aerospace, computer and electrical are engineering disciplines, at the very least. I encourage you to move forward into a rewarding career in engineering.

Good Luck, Pete Sturtevant, PE

Peter recommends the following next steps:

Contact a local engineering association in your area and talk to one or more engineers

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Gonzalo’s Answer

Physics gives you a very robust set of mathematical tools, and a strong base for any engineering degree. It also gives you strong techniques to solve for problems in very distinct manners. It will foster your problem solving and analytical skills, that are without a doubt a key asset for any engineering field.
Good news is you won't be limited to a particular field, on the contrary, you will have the base to explore whatever engineering field suits your interests better.
Choice of engineering field will have to be guided through the things you most enjoy doing. Usually engineering field will determine what are the types of problems you enjoy solving most.
Hope this helps and good luck.

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Vlad’s Answer

I worked with a Phd in Physics. His math skills combined with his programming skills were the perfect complement where math and programming were in demand. He know has to do graphic programming, and he knew how to program mathematical models to determine how to distribute gasoline and oil. Combining physics and computers is a powerful combination.

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Deon’s Answer

Raphael,

Yes, you can very well pursue a Master's in Engineering after completing an undergraduate degree in Physics. Actually, that is the best approach because an undergraduate degree in Physics is a great foundation for a Master's in Engineering. If you were to look at most undergraduate engineering curriculum you will notice that Physics are the foundational courses to understanding the engineering concepts. I have always thought of Physics as the essential building blocks for any engineering curriculum.

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Giovanni’s Answer

From experience and what I learned is that most graduates take exams into certain engineering programs to be able to classes in masters in engineering if there score is high enough and meets the requirements for your school of choice. Depending on your school I would take advise from an acdemic advisor for your school of choice to be able to get into a masters engineering program. I met fellow classmates at my institution be physics major and enrolled in masters engineering programs such as materials science to be able to do that, but was taking a few Undergraduate classes in order to meet certain requirements.
I hope this help,

Best of luck,

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Melanie’s Answer

I would also recommend speaking with a guidance counselor as they can help you determine which classes to take that may help both degrees. For instance, you may be able to choose from a list of courses for your under-graduate degree. Of those courses, some may be pre-requisites for the graduate degree. A counselor can help you make those decisions. Good luck!

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