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I'm still a student but I'm interested in marketing and I hope you advise me on how can I start in this field and which kind of books or articles I should read? , because I wanna graduate with sufficient skills and experience to find a good job


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Cheryl’s Answer

Hello,
I have found the following site that has some information, I hope it will be helpful. https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/business/blog/someone-told-me-about-pursuing-a-career-in-marketing/. Best wishes.

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Emily’s Answer

Hi Hoor,

I would definitely recommend trying to get an internship or find a mentor that you can shadow and ask questions. Constantly read articles and watch videos to keep up with current trends. And depending on what type of marketing you are interested in, you can take training courses and get certifications. For example, if you are interested in digital marketing, you can take Google's free Analytics course. At the end of the course, if you pass the exam, you will be a certified SEO google analytics; which is a strong certification to have on your resume!

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Susan’s Answer

My expertise is in B2B. I have interviewed a lot of candidates for roles in Marketing, and have observed that many candidates did not understand just how broad the field is. Better understanding of that might help you narrow what kinds of internships or self-education to pursue.

Basic, common skills across marketing include communications - in writing and speaking, project management, and analytics. The last one is particularly important - you must have a grasp of basic analytic methods and how/when to apply them. There is a lot of tracking and measurement in marketing.

A lot of folks think of advertising and branding when they hear "marketing" and that is a significant component. Branding is part creative, part business strategy. It is about shaping the impression you want people to have about your company (or organization - could be a non-profit, but for simplicity I'll say "Company"). Messaging is a core skill, which is more than being a good writer - it's knowing what you want to communicate as well as how. Bigger companies often engage outside agencies to assist with brand, and creating and placing advertisements, in which case the job inside the company involves a lot of project management, overseeing a vendor, and managing budgets. Analytics is key - tracking how your advertising investment is performing. Graphic artists are also important for branding and advertising. Small or medium sized organizations usually hire outside graphic artists by the job rather than having a full time artist on their payroll.

I would group together functions like Corporate Marketing, Corporate Communications, Public/Media Relations, and Analysts Relations. "Media" refers to all kinds of media, including social. These are functions where the main goal is to spread awareness of the company. It is related to branding and advertising, but the message is more involved, like getting a major news magazine to feature an interview with your CEO. Usually the audience is someone outside of the company, but it can also include internal communications, like when something big is happening and you want to be sure all your employees know what is going on. The key skills here are related to communications, but depending on the business your company is in, domain expertise may be needed. For example, if you work for a hospital, you would need to be knowledgeable about healthcare. Roles that require significant domain expertise are not usually entry level - that type of knowledge is gained on the job.

Demand Generation (also revenue marketing, lead generation, digital marketing) is all about reaching potential customers with your message and converting them to prospects - specific individuals and organizations that Sales can engage with to sell our products. There are lots of opportunities to be creative in Demand Gen roles, but the core skills are project and program management, analytics (since everything is forecast, tracked, and measured), and working with marketing automation tools. Demand Gen is responsible for things like email campaigns, events like webinars, trade shows and conferences, and often digital programs like web-driven campaigns.

Web-based marketing is an area unto itself. You need some hands-on skills here. The advice to take some free Google courses is excellent in my opinion. I would focus less on the "how" (implementation) and more on the "what" and "why."

Product marketing is about blending expert knowledge about the company's products into the demand gen programs, advertising, and other functions. Product marketers often develop the messaging that goes into product brochures, web site content, etc. They may train the sales teams about what is new in an upcoming product release. They work closely with product management (in some organizations, the product marketing and management functions are combined). Product management develops product plans, pricing and packaging (what capabilities will be combined into a single "Product" and will it be a physical thing that you buy or software that you download?) Product marketing and management require communications skills, project management, but also deep domain skills. In many industries a person would have formal training in that domain, be it engineering, or medicine, etc.


Susan recommends the following next steps:

Research free online courses in business analytics, using MS Excel, or read "Naked Statistics" by Charles Wheelan
Look on LinkedIn for internship opportunities in marketing - look at the kinds of skills that are required, and the associated activities
Take free course from Google on web-marketing/ web analytics

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Ian’s Answer

I highly recommend getting an internship at a marketing agency. Working at an agency improves your skillsets quickly in a high pressure environment. It requires you to learn quick, think quick and respond quick. The client-based/project-based work will be providing you a lot of opportunities to get a glimpse of what different aspects of marketing will be like. A comprehensive and integrated marketing experience will help you tremendously starting a career in marketing - it helped me a lot. Agencies often are involved in the creative process a lot, and also budgeting. It's gonna be a stressful job and demanding, but it's definitely worth it. Just be prepared and go in with a positive attitude.

In the meantime, try to develop a sense in marketing - in the sense that when you see people's marketing campaigns, don't just look at it as a consumer/audience but as a marketer. When you see new products coming out, try to think about what'd you do if you're marketing it. Read what people in the industry is doing, follow the big firms and read about their cases. Keep yourself informed and updated with the latest trends and marketing tools/platforms.

Hope this helps. Good luck!

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Molly’s Answer

To get experience while still in school, then do an internship during the summer! This is the BEST way to gain experience while still studying for your undergrad.

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Colleen’s Answer

I would second Molly's response, the most important thing you can do is get experience through an internship. This will also help you get a better feel for what you like and don't like within the field of marketing, as well as get a feel for workplace culture. Depending on what area of marketing you would like to pursue, I'd suggest looking into advertising agencies. They are a great place to get your foot in the door and get a feel for marketing to a broad range of businesses.

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Nancy’s Answer

Successful marketers know the business language - whether you're in a CPG company, B2B, or even nonprofit.
Marketing is more about the numbers than you think.
You'll need to be very proficient in math - whether it be for pricing, calculating the ROI for a campaign or asking for budget $.
Data Analytics is a nice complementary skillset to have with marketing.
I suggest looking up the link for the "Geek - Nerd-Suit" test to determine where your strengths and interests lie.

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Sudha’s Answer

I recommend looking for internship opportunities. Also, read up on articles online. Signing up for free online marketing classes will help you determine what area of marketing you are interested in.

hello Sudha, What will be the requirements to become a marketing manager or the steps / guidelines that should be taken? jennel J.

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Xavier’s Answer

My best advice, especially in a time like this, is to use your internet resource to the best of your ability. There are so many different people who have been successful in this industry that are willing to give you their story. Youtube is a great source.

I would also advise practicing the skill yourself. We are moving into a very digital world, so if you have access to a computer or smart phone, you practice marketing right from home. Maybe you have a friend is who is trying to start a business or you know about a small company who needs help with their marketing, see if you can help out. It might not be a paid gig at first, but the experience is what you need as soon as possible. Most companies ask about your experience when you apply for a job. Ironic that most people don't have it because they spent most of their time trying to pass classes in college. So do yourself a favor, get the experience while you get the education, so when it's time for you to work, you will be the best!

Good luck !

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Bernard’s Answer

Agree that it all depends on what marketing you're looking for but in the case of brand marketing, I would recommend at looking at global iconic brands like Nike, Coca-Cola, Apple and see how they approach their brand campaigns. A great resource for what's going on in the real world with B2C marketing is www.adweek.com. It is mostly US focused campaigns with some international but it gives a great overview on real life marketing applications. Hope this helps and best of luck

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Gina’s Answer

I would suggest looking at sites like LinkedIn and start networking. I would try to get into an internship or summer program. Ad agencies are a great source for this. The term "marketing" is so broad-- ad agencies usually have multiple departments-- print, digital, copywriting, analytics. An internship would most likely allow you to test the waters in many different areas and also be a great referral down the road.

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Nancy’s Answer

Successful marketers know the business language - whether you're in a CPG company, B2B, or even nonprofit.
Marketing is more about the numbers than you think.
You'll need to be very proficient in math - whether it be for pricing, calculating the ROI for a campaign or asking for budget $.
Data Analytics is a nice complementary skillset to have with marketing.
I suggest looking up the link for the "Geek - Nerd-Suit" test to determine where your strengths and interests lie.

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Amy’s Answer

Hello, Hoor.

I recommend the following with regards to the specific inquiries you made:

1. How can I start in this field? First and foremost - Networking. It is always about WHO you know and the impression which you made on them. Internships are a great way to gain on-hand experience and make relationships throughout the Marketing Field. However, you should begin networking now and can do it anywhere: Church; Volunteering; Professors; Scheduling interviews with marketing professionals; etc.

2. Which kind of books or articles I should read? Personal suggestions that are specific to you: https://gettinggrowth.com/career-in-marketing/ and https://growandconvert.com/marketing/marketing-job/.

3. [What will help me to] graduate with sufficient skills and experience to find a good job? The following skills are vital for marketers and what employers look for when hiring - continuing finding opportunities to develop them (ie.: Internship; Part-time job; Volunteer activities): Interpersonal skills; Strong oral and written communication skills; Numeracy and analytical ability; Creativity; Infuencive; Negotiation Skills; Teamwork; Strong Organization Skills; Business acumen; Self-driven; Ambitious.

Amy recommends the following next steps:

Network. Network. Network.
Find every opportunity to develop skills that are vital in the Marketing Industry.

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Jen’s Answer

As many have said before me, an internship is super helpful in getting marketing experience. While I was in college, I had three internships all with a slightly different marketing focus (selling, content and social media). Those internships helped me to land my first role with a small advertising agency. Once I was at the ad agency for about 2 years, it was just a natural opportunity to apply to some of the mid-level marketing jobs at bigger companies and brands. I know you asked what books to read, but I think it might make more sense to join a networking group in your area. It isn't always what you know but who you know.

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