Skip to main content
13 answers
Asked Viewed 487 times Translate

What would be the best way to learn coding or for a career in computer science?

I am in 11th grade. I find websites and the creation of code interesting. computer-science # coding technology programming

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

14
100% of 14 Pros

13 answers


Updated Translate

Ratan’s Answer

I would suggest to register with one of the following web site
1. https://www.codecademy.com/
2. https://codehs.com/
3. https://www.khanacademy.org/computing
and start with some basic courses like
1. Data structure
2. Basic algorithms
3. Basic programming in languages like Java for backend, Swift for iOS programming and Kotlin for Android programming or HTML/javascript/CSS if you want to learn how to design a web site
Thank you

Ratan recommends the following next steps:

Once you finish above then you can start to explore more advanced concepts like big data, machine learning and AI (the topics of today)
1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

Ziah to advance your coding career, look into earning programming certification to enhance your employment opportunities. Programming certification is offered through several different vendors and will demonstrate your proficiency with software programs. For example, earning Oracle Java certification ensures that you have the knowledge and skills to use this programming code. Most professionals specialize in several programming languages. However, a BACHELOR'S DEGREE usually results in a higher-paying career with more flexible options. A bachelor's or associate's degree in the field will require courses in computer science, programming, web development, operating systems, database concepts, and computer architecture.

Consider your academic interests, personal strengths, and long-term career goals when deciding whether to pursue a computer programming or general computer science degree Ziah. A computer programming concentration may be the best option for students pursuing programmer jobs after graduation. Employers offering computer programming positions typically prefer applicants with in-depth programming knowledge. Computer programming majors master several programming languages and can hit the ground running at new programming jobs. Computer programming degrees prepare graduates specifically for jobs writing code. Students considering other tech careers may benefit from a general computer science curriculum.

A general computer science program provides a broad overview of computing theory and develops a variety of computer science and tech skills. Students might earn a general computer science degree instead of a computer programming degree if they want a more versatile education that explores many tech topics, including software development and network architecture. Computer programming degrees prepare graduates specifically for jobs writing code. Students considering other tech careers may benefit from a general computer science curriculum. Many of these programs also offer concentrations or courses in computer programming.

Hope this is helpful Ziah

Thank you, I appreciate your advice on this matter. Ziah H.

The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be Ziah, thats code for anything in life is possible. John Frick

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Leo’s Answer

There are lots of great online resources that let you explore and try out different programming languages and what can be done with code.

As you think about what comes after high school, I wanted to share that I entered college as a computer science major without having done much coding (I read and played around with sample code). The first two years really opened my eyes about computer science: it's about understanding the technologies for building and making things in the digital world. Coding is a very important skill in the digital world, but its tool, and not the end product.

As you explore coding, I'd recommend you also focus on what it is you like to build, eg. visual web pages that bring pages and images from the physical world to digital, or complex search algorithms for making sense of the mountain of chaotic information, or test frameworks that keep the digital world from falling over. You'll learn new programming languages over time, but the fundamentals of how you break apart a problem and piece back together the solution through logic and instructions to make something novel will remain unchanged.
1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Leo’s Answer

I can't tell you what's the best way to learn coding, but I can tell you what worked for me: try creating a project that is meaningful to you and "work backwards" learning what you need to get there.

I honestly don't remember what was my first coding project, but I started coding when I was about 11 years old. However, I do remember one particular project that was very interesting to me: I wanted to make a ball bounce around the screen. That's it. In order to achieve that, I had to learn about loops, data structures (to store the data that I would need to do the animation), and Math (specifically, Trigonometry, Algebra and later Vector Calculus). Because I had a clear goal in my mind, Math was no longer a dull subject at school. I didn't have to ask my teacher "Why is it important to learn Math? When am I ever going to use all this stuff?" After that project was done, I just kept coding more and more projects.

So, I think the first thing you need to do is find a meaningful project (it doesn't have to be something big, just something that you find fun). Then you can go and look for tutorials on how to implement and code the stuff that you'll need for that project. Ratan already provided very good resources, so I don't think it's necessary to repeat that information.

Good luck!
0
Updated Translate

Mickael’s Answer

Hi Ziah,

For me, learning code means practice, practice and ... yes you guessed it, practice. There are two parts when it comes to writing code: the algorithm and the language. Both comes with theory and practice. Like Leo, for me, learning went through school classes, workshop and personal project. I took something I needed and start coding.
Couple example of projects:
- dice roller: I used to play role playing games a lot and I was annoyed when I had to roll 20 dice. So here I started with a small console based C code to do that. Then extended it to some UI.
- still in Role Playing Game, we used to play one where we needed to handle specific actions and thresholds that would go away after a while. I wrote a program where I entered the character skills and levels, request the action and the program was telling me what was happening.
- What movie to watch: this introduced a database with the idea of the program selecting movie titles we haven't seen for a while based on criteria like type of movie, duration ...
Then you learn from there. Like any other job I believe, coding comes with experience.
0
Updated Translate

Antony’s Answer

A lot of good advice on resources and training. However, those are all a means to an end. There is nothing more rewarding then creating something. Coding (and learning to code; and efficient code) is just the tool to get you there. Create projects for yourself like starting a new mobile app (even if copying an idea to make it better for learning). Also look for groups to learn with such as Hackathons, competitions, and user groups. Great programmers tinker and are always playing around with new ideas.
0
Updated Translate

Jessica’s Answer

Programming is one of the few skills that you can completely learn on your own! There are free courses you can take online via universities like Stanford. You can watch all the courses online and even download the assignments and do them at your own pace. Now you won't get graded on these assignments (that's what college professor is for) but these are great ways to get a taste of what it's like to study computer science in a college setting.

You can also checkout Udemy, Coursera, Linkedin Learn, and many others at no cost or with little cost, to learn topics like Programming in Python, or building your own website from scratch in 10 hours on avg, usually done over a course of a week or 2 at your own pace. You have to be very self motivated to learn on your own, and practice practice practice.

There is no shortage of compSci tutorials online. You can learn to code if you put your heart into it!

Good Luck!
0
Updated Translate

Michael’s Answer

Coding is not a career but rather a skill.
I assume you would like to pursue a career in Computer Science or Computer Engineering. My advice would be not to look for any shortcuts and to get the best possible college education. This will not only provide you with the coding skills but also will allow you to build a solid foundation and scientific understanding of Computer Science.
0
Updated Translate

Emmett’s Answer

Just wanted to mention hackathons, since no one has touched on that yet! Back during pre-Covid times, hackathons were some of my favorite places to meet other tech-minded people, scarf down free food, build something fun with no consequences, get an adrenaline rush from not sleeping, and win cool prizes (sometimes). You can go to practice a language/framework you already know or learn a new one! And they're super welcoming to first-time attendees--there are people of all skill levels and experience types, and lots of people go without knowing anyone else there. During one hackathon I attended, there were Macbooks prizes given to the best team made up of only newcomers (i.e. people who had never done hackathons before). I'm not sure how many are in-person right now due to Covid, but online hackathons may be even better because you can sleep in your own home and not have to travel, if a hackathon usually takes place far away. There are also online CTFs (Capture the Flag competitions), which are like hackathons, but for penetration testing (cybersecurity).
0
Updated Translate

Lilian’s Answer

To code is like learning a new language. You have to practice.
I recommend a site like https://www.codecademy.com/
You can select the language you want to learn and practice it
0
Updated Translate

Kris’s Answer

Seek out a coding bootcamp, either local to you or virtual (https://www.switchup.org/rankings/best-online-bootcamps). They are intense, but you'll learn a lot. In addition to codeacademy.com, there are great courses available at Udemy and Pluralsight.
0
Updated Translate

Lucie’s Answer

Lots of great answers here, I found that in order to advance or learn about coding a few sources can be very helpful:
- Summer bootcamp: Or bootcamp, some introduction to coding.
- LinkedIn Learning: A lot of good content and very well done, entertaining and with good images to convey the message. I think the subscription is $29/month but well worth it. There might be some free content too.
- YouTube: Needs a little bit more discipline but you can definitely find a lot of good tips and tricks for coding on YouTube and follow the YouTubers.
- Meetup: You have coding groups that meetup virtually or in person and even better specialized in the language you want to deepen (Python, Java, etc.)
- Local groups and clubs: Always good to know but there are usually local schools that have groups open as a hobby. Coding is a huge trend right now and googling it in your area should give you some good results.

Hope this helps,
Cheers
0
Updated Translate

Brayden’s Answer

Hello!

Learning code is challenging and takes time to learn all the tips and trick that are out there. Depending on the language there are certain shortcuts that can drastically reduce the amount it takes for you to write your program. When I was starting to learn code I was using solver programs like MatLab to help solve algebraic functions that would be difficult to solve without. MatLab is a great starting system becuase you learn how to create basic code and overtime you will find ways to make your code shorter and flow better. I know when I started my code was very direct, do this, solve that etc., and as I spent more time working the software I became more comfortable setting myself up to have a long form code that achieved multiple steps throughout the code. Another good learning software is Arduino. When I used Arduino it was primary used for controlling small motors and sensors for a school project. Arduino is great because you are able to see the result of your code by watching something move, which is very cool. What's great about systems like python, matlab and arduino is that there are a ton of online forums that you can use to talk with people through issues you may be having.

Hopefully this helps!
0