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What made you want to be a part of the medical community??

What sparked your interest in your specific field?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Rita’s Answer

I think I went into medicine for several reasons:
1. I'm easily bored and you will not be bored in medicine because there is too much to learn and you can never learn it all.
2. I like to interact with people and you interact with a lot of people. Even if you don't like them, the time is short.
3. I like puzzles and I think of medicine as a puzzle that you need to solve.
4 . You have a stable income and you will always have a job...remember COVID
5. It is a respectable job.
6. In the future, it's easier to get a loan if you need money.
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AMY’s Answer

Truly, the greatest joy in my life has always come from lending a hand to others. My mother often fondly recalls how, even as a little girl, I would mother my dolls and my younger sister with a natural instinct to care and nurture. However, turning this inherent ability into a career wasn't an immediate decision for me. Like many young people, I was unsure about my future path after high school. With my grandfather ill at the time, I opted to stay close to home and attend community college, allowing me to continue to visit and care for him.

Initially, I was drawn to the field of neuroscience, but after some gentle persuasion from my mother, I decided to apply to the nursing program. At just 19, I was the youngest applicant to be accepted into an associate degree program at our local community college. While I wasn't entirely sure about becoming a nurse, I decided to give it a shot, confident that I would find my way as I progressed.

My first assignment was at a nursing home, where I formed connections with several residents. This experience opened my eyes to the fact that nursing isn't simply about "taking care" of someone. It's about being present in their most vulnerable moments, sharing their happiness, applauding their resilience, and providing just the right amount of motivation.

After a decade of serving in Critical Care as a Nurse, I furthered my education and training. Today, I work as a Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner at a local family practice. The clinical experience I've gained is wonderful, but the life lessons I've learned from both roles are truly priceless.
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Susie’s Answer

Two events: After two fractures, back-to-back, and an orthopedic surgeon simply grabbed my wrist and fully extended my elbow to get full range in my left arm- ouch- I thought "There has GOT to be a better way..." and that lead me to physical therapy. Then a few months later, I had a hospital admission for appendicitis and realized that is where I want to be for my career. My new pediatrician- in her first week in our community- had come to the hospital to be present at my surgery, which was so comforting. I looked up to her so much and I told her, "We are going to work together someday." Sure enough, 25 years later, she oversaw the Developmental Follow-Up Clinic at UIC where I was doing a clinical internship and I was able to thank her for inspiring my career choice! So two doctors inspired me to become a pediatric physical therapist: an orthopod (for a negative reason) and the most lovely Dr. Nagamani Beligere, who looked after me as a child and later as a graduate student!!!
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Christina’s Answer

Hello Amelia,
My exposure to the medical field began in college when I took a summer job as a camp counselor for children with diabetes. The camp was run by 2 female physicians who taught us about diabetes, how to test for low blood sugar, give insulin injections, how diet influenced a child's blood sugar, and how to recognize a when a child's blood sugar was getting low. By balancing all of these things, it allowed these kids to have a normal camp experience safely which I thought was amazing. It was not only very interesting (intellectually stimulating) but it helped these kids to lead a normal life. Working in the medical field, you are always working to get people back to a healthy life.
After the camp experience I changed my major to Nursing, started my career in the ICU and CCU, then went back to school after 5 years to get my masters degree. I worked in Internal Medicine and Cardiology the rest of my career and ran a Heart Failure clinic the final 11 years before retiring 2 years ago. I found Cardiology fascinating, a specialty that was continually evolving and one in which I could have a huge impact on patient's well being. I have to say it was the most rewarding career I can imagine and gave me good work/life balance.
Best of luck in your search.
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Robert’s Answer

I liked working with people especially children. For several years I was a medical technologist at our local children’s hospital. I loved it for a hundred different reasons. The kids were sooooo much fun and became all the tests were “micro” we got to see our patients from the time they arrived till they were diagnosed and helped. Later on I branched out into psychology and enjoyed that as well. Once I got my doctorate the money was great. Let’s be honest. It’s fulfilling to love what you do but when you can love your job while driving a Tesla….. well that’s even better.

Robert recommends the following next steps:

Talk to people who do what you’d like to do. These jobs take lots of time, education, and money.
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Sergio A.’s Answer

My journey began when my son's health and mine were compromised That created a newly found passion in a more natural and holistic way to heal the body. Approximately 9 years ago I began learning more of alternative and natural ways to heal. Unfortunately, with the current conventional healthcare system I, cannot depend a healthcare system that focuses on treating the symptom instead of the person. Now as a certified integrative nutrition coach and naturopath practitioner, and fully understand how the body has the innate ability to heal itself given the chance.


Way too many people in my community are either very sick and some even dying from unnecessarily due to lack of knowledge and depending on conventional medicine. I am a compassionate person who wears his heart on his sleeve and my goal and intentions are to educate my clients, guide them to optimal Individualized health by using food as medicine, natural remedies like herbs essential oils meditation exercise and meditation.
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Trinity’s Answer

I always knew I wanted to do something in health care I just wasn’t sure what. When I found nutrition and dietetics I knew this was how I wanted to help others. There are a lot of chronic diseases that can be reversed and prevented by nutrition. It’s incredible to see patients go from being at their unhealthiest to their healthiest just by changing what’s on their plate. I will say it isn’t always easy, there are plenty of people who don’t think changing their eating will fix their illnesses. But those patients who trust you and make the changes are the ones that make this career worth it!
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ERIC’s Answer

I was looking to pay off my credit card debt and I decided to find a weekend job. I discovered I could work part time as a Companion at a nursing home in my community. I enjoy helping people!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi there Amelia,

A Personal Odyssey into the Medical Realm

My aspiration to join the medical fraternity is deeply rooted in a burning desire to aid others and make a positive difference in their lives. Ever since I was a kid, the thought of offering care and support to those in need has always appealed to me. Seeing the commitment and empathy of health care professionals only added fuel to my desire to contribute to this honorable profession.

Fascination with a Particular Field

The particular field that caught my attention is [insert specific field here]. This branch of medicine intrigued me with its mix of scientific exploration, patient engagement, and the potential for significant improvements in healthcare. The chance to dive into the details of [specific field] and strive to enhance patient outcomes strongly aligned with my professional goals.

As I journeyed through my academic life and got exposed to a variety of medical disciplines, I found myself more and more attracted to the complexities and challenges inherent in [specific field]. The opportunity to contribute to advancements in diagnosis, treatment, or research within this specialized area solidified my resolve to pursue a career in this particular field.

Moreover, seeing the impact of [specific field] on people's lives, either through personal experiences or compelling narratives, further cemented my commitment to this branch of medicine. The potential to make a real difference in the lives of patients and contribute to the broader healthcare landscape through [specific field] continues to be a powerful motivator in my quest for excellence in this field.

A NOTE

The genetic issues in the Greek males in my father's family were caused by a gene for type IV familial hypercholesterolemia, which my uncle was homozygous for. Sadly, Mike passed away at the age of 38. My father was heterozygous [half hypercholesterolemic] and passed away at 50 years old.

Please refer to the last section of my BIO for information on how to enhance nutrient intake to boost physical and academic performance. This pertains to B vitamins, magnesium, and zinc.

In conclusion, my passion for positively impacting others' health, coupled with the unique combination of scientific exploration and patient care within nutrition and dietary education, has played a key role in shaping my journey toward becoming a valuable member of the medical fraternity with ancillary nutritional advice. I have furthered this by developing instructional software.

Top 3 Credible Reference Publications or Domain Names Used:

The New England Journal of Medicine: This esteemed publication is widely known for its authoritative research papers, reviews, and perspectives across various medical specialties.
Mayo Clinic: Being a leading medical institution, Mayo Clinic offers trustworthy information on different medical fields, including insights into specific areas of medicine.
PubMed: A comprehensive database consisting of peer-reviewed biomedical literature, PubMed provides valuable insights into specific medical fields through scholarly articles and research publications.
These sources were crucial in providing authoritative information and insights into the medical fraternity and specific fields within medicine.

May God Bless You Abundantly,
James.
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