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There seems to be a lot of hype around learning how to code. Yes, it is an expanding and well-paid field, but it is truly worth learning if you are passionate about business? Is it really meant for everyone?


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John’s Answer

Learning how to code really isn’t enough to future-proof your career Aleena.

Programming languages change all the time. The real skill that guarantees you a job in the technological world is knowing how to learn new skills. In fact, some programming jobs are already being replaced by artificial intelligence. It is the ability to learn new skills that is the real superpower of your generation.

LEARNING TO CODE IS REALY CODE FOR LEARNING TO LEARN

To prepare for this reality, there are a growing number of learn-to-code organizations exposing students as young as Kindergarten to computer science education. And it makes sense. The hypothesis operates like something of an “if-then” statement, a mainstay of computer science: If coding is the language of tech, and tech is the future of work, then young people need to learn this language in order to succeed in their upcoming careers. In essence, coding is a ticket into the party—being able to tell the computer what to do is an entryway into our technological world and, therefore, a path to upward mobility. Simply knowing how to code does not guarantee a lucrative career. Because knowing how to code today does not mean you will know how to code tomorrow.

LEARN HOW EVERYDAY SOFTWARE WORKS

Coding is not a goal. It’s a tool for solving problems. Even professional developers can forget that when they get caught up in the minutiae of a new language or a religious argument over the best IDE (Integrated Development Environment). However, much of the “learn to code” frenzy seems to spring from the idea that you can achieve fame and riches by starting a tech company and you need to actually code something first. Programming is not a get-rich-quick scheme. Even if you do hit the jackpot, the CEOs of successful tech companies do not spend a lot of time coding, even if they started out behind a keyboard. There are simply too many other tasks involved in running a company. So if coding is what you really love to do, you probably wouldn’t want to be a CEO in the first place.

Unless your goal is to become a professional programmer, it may be more useful to learn the basics of how the networks and software you use every day work, and their biases and blind spots, rather than go about adding to the world’s stock of bad code. You can drive a car without knowing how an engine works, but it would be handy to know what makes the engine stall or that the steering skews to the right. Knowing how to evaluate the privacy bargain we make with tech companies, escape the filter bubble, analyze the values behind a piece of software, verify information you get on Twitter, understand how the Internet is structured or how search and recommendation algorithms work, is probably more valuable in everyday life than writing Python code.

“Life is short Aleena.” In the time that you saved by not learning to code, learn to do something you enjoy more.

Hope this was Helpful Aleena

Thank You Ariel. “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” – Erma Bombeck John Frick

Thank You Malorie. “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” –Anne Frank John Frick

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Andrea E’s Answer

Learning to code should be an integral part of any business profession that requires the person to solve problems. Programming teaches people how to dissect problems down to their logical components making it easier to solve. This skill is important in all business environments, regardless as to whether the person is in a technology position.

Also, learning to code allows the person to assist in the development of the business requirements documents that IT needs in order to develop IT solutions to business problems. It helps the person articulate to IT the information IT needs using IT's language.

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Kim’s Answer

Well, Andrea already covered all of my ideas. So, I will add this. When I was working with jobseekers, and helping on resumes, I got a few computer-minded individuals. I would insist that they include their customer service skills on their resumes. They would say they didn't do customer service type work. Then I would ask them about how they created products for people who didn't even know what they really wanted, and that was a definite trigger in them! Then I asked about how they worked with people who had no understanding of the potential and limitations of the product. And that hit another trigger!

You don't need to become an expert coder. But, you do need to familiarize yourself with it so you are able to interact with those who do the work for you!

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Beth’s Answer

I've been a part of the accounting profession for 10 years now, and in the last couple of years I've definitely seen how having a strong aptitude and knowledge of emerging technology (including coding) is very relevant to a career in business. While you may not need to be able to specifically code for your future job, having an understanding of how it works and how things can be automated in business is very important. My job has grown to include skills involving workflows and robots that my staff have developed in order to automate tasks that used to be done manually. I have to understand how these programs work (including the specifics of the design my team has put together for each task) in order to get comfortable with the reliability of the output. I give this example, because I definitely never expected to need to know these things in my career path in business, and in particular accounting. I have found that the continual learning in this space is really important in a career in business.

Beth recommends the following next steps:

If your interested in learning more about how changes in technology are impacting business, my firm offers a free app that can be found at the following site: https://www.pwc.com/us/digitalfitness

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Joe’s Answer

Writing code or scripts is technical and a needed skill in demand by many organizations to provide insights for what their data is telling them. If you are a curious personal that has a drive to learn answers to questions, or if you have a little "Hardy Boys" or "Nancy Drew" side to you, when learning some coding is a great way to learn business systems and learn your company's data in order to answer of of those tough business questions.

I received my MBA and have a well-rounded education and understanding of business, but this is complimented by my coding and scripting skills in understanding why my clients need these insights into their business to answer questions and solve problems. Most companies have multiple business systems that contain information in their various platforms that may be contained in other systems also where double entry of the data is being done and if not efficient. So, what if data from one systems could be automatically synced to the other systems on a daily basis automatically without a person having to enter that data twice? Companies and organizations find value in these types of solutions so their people are not having to maintain two systems with duplicate work. With enough experience you can combine your business expertise with your coding skills to perhaps a consultant level where you can either work for a company internally or start your own business to serve your clients. The potential and opportunities are limitless and in need.

Best of luck!

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David’s Answer

I agree, learning to code or write database queries is an integral part of many positions now. I have an IT background so coding wasn't an issue when I transitioned to operations. I was amazed at one point when my company was sold and the new CEO came in - he was a Harvard grad and could sit down with no knowledge of a database table structure and write his own query - his background wasn't IT or coding, but he knew the benefits of understanding that aspect. Access to IT support for coding, reports, or pulling data isn't always readily available.

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Lizzie’s Answer

I don't like this new push of "everyone should learn how to code." Coding is not for everyone. It is not easy. There's a reason why it is in high-demand, there's a reason why intro-level computer science classes have wait lists and then when you get to upper-level classes, they are not full--it's because people drop out/drop off the major path.

One reason I initially wanted to learn to code was because I wanted to work in sports or in media, like for a magazine. The thing about tech is that it is permeating almost every aspect of people's lives. Being a businesswoman, or a writer, or a doctor, or a lawyer, or any job and knowing some code will make you stand out. And that's why I think people should at least know some coding basics. You don't need to be a full-time software engineer, but having some coding know-how will be handy no matter what job or industry you end up in.

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Alexandra’s Answer

First of all, I think it is a great question. I have asked myself that question and I can say that, as a tax consultant with a law degree, I likely will not need to learn to code or use those skills on a daily basis in my job, but I think it is very, very valuable and I have started taking some basic classes. I think everyone should do it if they have the time and energy and with the understanding that it can only help you. Sure, it is not for everyone and it might not even be for a number of people who have learned to code years ago.

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Alex’s Answer

Hi Aleena,

I work in marketing and have held two roles in my career: the first role did not require any coding experience and the second role did. My advice for you, look through a job posting website and select a handful of roles that interest you. Read through those job descriptions and see if coding is a skill they are looking for. If it is, you should definitely spend time learning to code. Depending on what part of business interests you, you may not need that skill.

I myself had to learn coding on the job which was stressful. I wish I had picked up the skill in college or in my free time prior to starting my professional career.

Good luck!


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sathiskumar’s Answer

As my view is you mentioned your interest are in business so better to follow the passion and learn the skills which are require to excel there.But keep in mind that over period interest too change so in that case if u felt coding would have interest you and if u feel that is your cup of tea then go ahead and pursur further sky is the limit. See the Indian cricket icon Dhoni initially he started his carrier as football goal keeper and later in his carrier he succeed in cricket.all the best for your future.

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David’s Answer

I agree, learning to code or write database queries is an integral part of many positions now. I have an IT background so coding wasn't an issue when I transitioned to operations. I was amazed at one point when my company was sold and the new CEO came in - he was a Harvard grad and could sit down with no knowledge of a database table structure and write his own query - his background wasn't IT or coding, but he knew the benefits of understanding that aspect. Access to IT support for coding, reports, or pulling data isn't always readily available.

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Richard’s Answer

Is tech meant for everyone? No! If you're passionate about business, I might spend some time learning python basics, but much more time on excel and ppt, and much much more time reading and meeting people and learning about your interests. Every business decision boils down to make-or-buy -- and if you aren't going to be the best coder, the value to you in learning it is going to be in knowing what can be done.

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Amanda’s Answer

Hi Aleena,

I graduated and joined the workforce a few years ago. I took one coding class in college, but did not find it too productive or helpful. I joined the workforce in business, and I will say, I learned quickly that while I can do my job without coding, it absolutely gives you a leg up if you learn how. I have had three roles, and did not need to code during any of them as they were primarily excel/ppt based. However, I am now taking the step to learn some basic coding skills to help take my skillsets to the next level and know that it will open me up to more opportunities. Best of luck!

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Amanda’s Answer

Hi Aleena,

I graduated and joined the workforce a few years ago. I took one coding class in college, but did not find it too productive or helpful. I joined the workforce in business, and I will say, I learned quickly that while I can do my job without coding, it absolutely gives you a leg up if you learn how. I have had three roles, and did not need to code during any of them as they were primarily excel/ppt based. However, I am now taking the step to learn some basic coding skills to help take my skillsets to the next level and know that it will open me up to more opportunities. Best of luck!

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Hyesun’s Answer

Hello, I was a marketer for five years and decide to change my career as a software developer.
I would say yes, you'll find a job easier when you have an idea about coding. There are many jobs related to both business and software, so many universities have a degree program for both. I have a business degree as well, but I think business in undergraduate is a broad of learning to apply skills to your job. Once you started your job related to your degree, you'll see how the industry is different from your class. However, if you know some about business information technology; mostly about database and security, you can apply them to your job. Therefore, for your job security, I recommend you to learn at least some part of software development especially the information technology area. Good luck on your career!

Hyesun recommends the following next steps:

Research about business information technology

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Priscila’s Answer

Hi Aleena! If you're interested in a career in business, I would say that knowing how to code isn't a must but still very useful. Instead, I recommend learning how to use Excel's formulas such as if statements, vlookup, and how to create pivot tables. It'd also be helpful to take Salesforce's trailhead courses and learn how to create reports. These are technical skills that I have to use on the job daily.

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Sydney’s Answer

Hello,
I haven't been able to read through the other amazing responses you've received but here's my take:
1. I don't believe coding is enough to secure your future, it adds to your resume but it's not needed, learning a language isnt too difficult as long as you know one coding language
2. If you want a combination of coding and business, maybe consider something in security. CIS (computer information science) where you'll be able to pursue a career in security but there are a lot of business and coding classes mixed in with this.

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Dan’s Answer

I believe it is a very strong skill to have. Once the basics are learned. The same skill set and coding can be applied to a multitude of settings in almost every field. If you’re trying to set yourself apart from the competition, you should pursue it!

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Madura’s Answer

Yes, absolutely !

Hey Madura, could you please elaborate on this answer? Why do you agree? Gurpreet Lally

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Dennis’s Answer

Great question.. here's my view on this. I credit my success in my career in part to the broad range of skills I have accumulated over the years. Some of which is, in fact, coding. Being able to demonstrate that I have a wide range of knowledge has been extremely important. Whether it's scripting something that is a very manual process (applies to your business interest), or whether it's web page editing - it makes you a very well rounded individual. It allows you to speak the speak if you will... know what the coders are talking about. While you may not want to focus on it, gaining that type of knowledge will definitely give you the edge. Good luck!!

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Samith’s Answer

Every person has their own way of doing things. Tomorrow there could be something more relevant and we will have similar questions on choosing around this and that. Hence, there is one main answer that will help you in the long run... that is "Don't do it if it is not fun for you". Hence, give it a try and if you enjoy it... well thats what you should be getting into.

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BINU’s Answer

Hi Aleena,
Yes, I agree with your point that having good programming skills can help fetch you a well
paid job. Whether to pursue a career in software or not when one is passionate about
business, I feel can be decided by doing a self analysis.
I am listing a few questions and the answers to these questions should help you take a decision.

1) Am I really passionate about becoming an entrepreneur ?
2) Am I having an opportunity to pursue a management program currently ?
3) How is the current environment looking for starting a new venture ?
4) Do I see some opportunity to partner with someone and get relevant business exposure ?
5) How is my current economic sitation ? Is there any compelling factor to take up a job and start
earning quickly ?
6) Do I feel that programming is something which I can pick up, learn and shine ?

I believe a rational approach and practical analysis is key to decide which way one should go.

Wishing you all the very best!

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Shoib’s Answer

Hi Aleena,
You are passionate about business, that's nice, but you will have to first figure out what business you are looking forward to.
If you don't know the insight of the business activities then you cannot run it realtime, which means if you are someone who is looking for business which is associated to technology then its best in your interest to know about programming/scripting at least an overview and the potential it has.
You should know the power of products associated to your business.
Hope it helps :) , all the best!!!


Regards,
-Shoib

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Danny’s Answer

Hi Aleena,

I found that business and technology often intertwine in a lot of professions nowadays. Now more than ever, data and technology are valuable, learning code can be worth it even if you are passionate about business. It's not absolutely necessary for business professionals, but it will definitely elevate your efficiency and ability to complete tasks. I think if you find that you want to learn code, there are plenty of free online resources to do so, but if your main objective is to use technology in the business field, there might be other tools you can use without coding. There are many startups and established tech companies that have built tools for you to achieve your tasks without needing to write a single line of code.

Danny recommends the following next steps:

My recommendation would be to try to take some free coding courses, and see if you enjoy the learning.
If you find that you enjoy coding, then I would encourage you to continue building your knowledge and use it to supplement your passion for business.
If not, I would still encourage you to learn about technology that isn't related to writing code and how it could improve the tasks that you have to do day to day.

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