Skip to main content
6 answers
Asked Viewed 66 times Translate

Is it worth it to get a degree vs trade school?


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
5
100% of 5 Pros

6 answers


Updated Translate

Lynn’s Answer

What I've learned over my career is that there are many paths to success but the most enjoyable one is where you are able to use your strengths. I've also learned that we tend to learn what our strengths truly are through trial and error. College may be the best route for some and trade schools for others. Military service or Peace Corps could be the best route yet for others. You can do more than just one. Serve in the military then college or go to college then serve in the military. The opportunities are endless. Key is to check in with yourself as you go along your path and see if you are feeling successful, the success can be measured and if your choices meet your needs and fulfill your passions. Hope this helps.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Doug’s Answer

Many paths to find success. Some of the most successfully/wealthiest people I know have went to trade school, developed there skills and started successful businesses. But like mentioned below "It really depends on what you enjoy doing". I started my life after high school going to a Jr College studying to become a chef, after the 1st semester I realized it was not the right path for my life. Now I work for one of the best companies in the world. Try to find your passion, leverage your strengths so you can maximize your income. Also, relationships are everything!



1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Will’s Answer

I'd echo what other before me have mentioned. I'm a software engineer that started out in industrial engineering. In that industrial engineering era, I worked with many folks in the trades at a chemical process plant - all had interesting, active, and lucrative careers. It all depends upon desired lifestyle. The pipe fitters, millwrights, and operators I worked with spent most of their days on the plant floor working with heavy machinery while folks in engineering made it onto the floor on occasion, though spent a lot time planning, designing, and meeting in an office setting.

On a personal note, I thoroughly enjoy engineering and would recommend it in a heartbeat. I have nothing but respect and admiration for those in the trades though - I have many family members that do extremely well as sprinkler fitters (fire protection).

0
Updated Translate

David’s Answer

Since you have asked this question you already know it is difficult to answer. I was able to receive a Masters Degree in Mechanical Engineering without having a student loan, or other debt, to pay off. This gave me a head start in earning potential. If I had taken the trade school route no doubt I would have been earning a good living 2 to 3 years before graduating from university. However, the earning potential for an engineering, or other, degree is better in the long term. It is definitely possible to go to trade school and earn a college degree afterwards which could be the best of both.

0
Updated Translate

Michael’s Answer

It really depends on what you enjoy doing. Generally speaking (very generally) a college degree leads to white collar jobs which are typically desk jobs. If that thought horrifies you there are two paths. The first will be trade school. You can make a very good living in the trades, but you will likely spend some time pursuing additional certifications. For example, a welder might be certified to join two pieces of metal and get paid one amount, but if they are certified to do that same thing underwater, they will make significantly more. Certifications are usually a few weeks in training followed by an evaluation - so it is not typically a long commitment.

The second path is becoming an engineer, architect, archaeologist, etc. These take degrees beyond a 4 year degree and can cost tens of thousands of dollars and years to obtain. When they are done, they might make the same amount as a certified underwater welder, and be far less dangerous.

0
Updated Translate

Kyle’s Answer

It definitely depends on what you want to do - I think the earning potential via both paths is great. When I was going in college, I worked in construction doing framing, plumbing and electrical because that was what my family had always done and I really enjoyed it. But I also love working with data, so it was worth getting a college degree to pursue that long term. For me, the job security of having my degree was worth it because I have experienced the ups & downs of the construction market. That being said, I often miss working in a more hands on environment. I know this wasn't an "answer" per-say, but hopefully it helps!

0