Skip to main content
23 answers
26
Asked 989 views

Was your major related to your profession now?

Looking for different paths that people took

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

26

23 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michel’s Answer

I originally started a degree in Allied Health because I thought I wanted to be a nurse then I transitioned over to Biology which is very relevant to medicine so originally no my degree was not relevant to the work that I do now, but I fell in love with Biology the second I started doing classes that were relevant to it, and that really helped guide my decision of going towards medicine.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jubanjan’s Answer

A group of PwC professionals are answering your advice question based on their personal experience. Here are few examples of our career paths to create your own career journey.

- [x] Edward - "I had a major in Film & Media studies and now I am helping clients on Digital Commerce and digital marketing. "
- [x] Krystal - "I was a CPA who started at PwC in corporate tax. Once we started digitizing and automating tax work with technology, I pivoted to a technology project manager. I now am in our Products and Technology group at PwC and love seeing the impact that automations have on tax professionals day to day work. My advice is to encourage you to speak up when you see something new at your job that interests you and see where it takes your career!"
-[x] Jubanjan - "I majored in Computer Science and now I am working in Software Engineering, I like building stuff with code and my advice would be to explore as much as possible and know yourself and that should help you zero in on what you want to do. "
-[x] Shanda: "I had a double major in Accounting and Computer Information Systems. Started my career in Audit, moved into several Talent Management and Purpose & Inclusion roles and now I'm a Business Recruiter. My advice is to be open to rebranding yourself within a company."
Thank you comment icon Explore on Access Your Potential’s site potential career opportunities like internships and paid consulting externships for nonprofits. Sign up to have access to these free programs and more at accessyourpotential Jubanjan Dhar
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Roberto’s Answer

Hello Anna,

If I understand correctly what you might be really asking yourself, it is a great question that is not only limited to college or the choice of a major. Life itself is about that question. Time and again you will be presented with choices on which door to take without the benefit of too much foresight. My experience is that a choice by itself wont be the limiting factor as long as you stay, both committed to your chosen path and open to other choices.

I myself have stuck to my major, you could say but the filed on which I work has changed so much that even though it is the same, it might look very different now. Even others with the same mayor have gone many different paths. I majored in Telecommunications and Electronics, two fields that have branched and evolved so much that now many of us look more like IT professionals. Also I work along side other great professionals that majored in Law, Psychology or even culinary arts ! My buddy is a great security engineer yet still can grill and smoke like pro.

My point is do something you think you like, something with a high probability of success and commit to it without closing other doors. Like my dad used to say: "It is not the door we take what counts, but the ones we do not close behind"

I wish you good luck !!!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Elyse’s Answer

Hi Anna,

I love this question! Both my own career path and the paths of those closest to me have not followed a traditional trajectory, and I love to share that story with anyone who is uncertain about where their path might lead.

As an undergrad, I entered with no idea what I wanted as my major, though I suspected perhaps sociology. After taking an History seminar to fulfill my writing requirement, I ended up pursuing a degree in History. Outside of my studies, I began working at one of the university museums and added a minor in Museum Studies. After graduating, I sought work in museums, but instead found an operational role in a for-profit education company. This work led me to realize I wished to work directly with students, and I pursued my Masters Degree in School Counseling. I served as a School Counselor for 5 years, and then received an opportunity to take on a Director Role for the yoga studio where I was already teaching yoga classes, which is where I still am today!

I share this story as an example of how not-linear a career path may be, but there are still commonalities that showed up in each position. The desire to work with community in an educational capacity, the desire to work with people, and the desire for a career that allows for creativity and leadership.

I highly encourage you to consider your core values, strengths, and interests and keep your mind open as you navigate your own career path!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Velvizhi’s Answer

Hi Anna!

My major in college was marketing and now I work in the cybersecurity and cloud consulting space. I switched my major 6-7 times, and looking back, I wish I would have stressed less about picking the perfect major, since often times, most people I've met don't actually work in their college major. :)

I ended up accidentally falling into cybersecurity consulting and loving it because of the continuous learning and opportunities. Also, working as a cyber consultant requires continuous research on security products and technology trends in market, so I was able to bring some of my market research skills and passions to use.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Nandini’s Answer

Hello Anna,

I have an engineering degree in computer science and I currently work as tech consultant for a Big 4. I still do work in the field of technology - however, currently, I don't apply anything I learn into my work. Mostly because the world of technology is every evolving. That said, I think even if I studied Electronics or Mechanical, I would have still succeeded and be at this point.

Hope my answer helps! Best of luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James’s Answer

My intended major was political science when I first applied to college. It still is political science, and I am over halfway there. A lot has changed since. I have been in law enforcement for six years now. I am currently doing law enforcement in the Marine Corps. Political Science isn't totally related to what I do now. I love what I do now, but I still have aspirations of running for office.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Riza’s Answer

Yes. I studied pharmacy in college then I worked as a Pharmacy clerk and technician. I also do part time as english teacher. Make sure that the degree you want to pursue you will have advantage in the long run. You can take different jobs for the experience and then choose whatever makes you happy the most.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brianna’s Answer

Yes! My undergraduate major was in Cognitive Science with a focus on Psycholinguistics. I honestly had a lot of trouble finding a related job right out of college. I took a gap year where I lived at home and did an unrelated job before attending graduate school for an MS in clinical speech-language pathology. I now work as a speech therapist and work a lot with stroke survivors, people with language processing disorders, and people with traumatic brain injuries. It actually fits with my undergraduate major very well, which is interesting because I did not know about speech pathology as a job options until looking at graduate school options.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sophie’s Answer

Hi Anna,
Yes, I would say my master's degree in psychology is related to my profession because I enjoy relating to people and communicating with them about anything. My desire is to one day have an office and be there for people of all cultures, ages, gender, and profession when they need that someone to talk to about whatever they are dealing with. I do plan to continue my education in psychology and mental health so I can be of more support to the world around me. Right now, I'm using my degree as a career counselor, and I absolutely love it.
Thanks for your question,
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jessica’s Answer

Hi Anna,
This is a great question! Many times, when a student goes into a social science or humanities degree (i.e. English, Sociology, Art History), students have a hard time envisioning a career because there may not be an obvious connection. The focus can be more on soft skills and a focus on gaining experience while in college (i.e. student orgs, internships) to shape a career path.
I have my degree in communications and am a career advisor - I use soft skills I've gained with my degree and the experiences I had in several college positions to make a case for my current job.
Bottom line, your college major isn't always perfectly aligned with your job opportunities. And, that's okay. As long as you are building practical skills outside of the classroom.
I hope this helps!
Jessica
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Frances’s Answer

Yes. I majored in engineering and now I’m working as a Civil Engineer in the public sector. With this degree specifically, you can do many things with it. Some people have gone for their master’s degree and either became a university professor or did something business related (i.e. starting their own engineering company). Others have gone into the military using their skills and knowledge in engineering and science. Depending on what you want to major in, you can try to be creative with the skills you have and go down a different route with it.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jax’s Answer

Hello Anna!

I don't have a major. Never went to college or got a degree. Went into several trades growing up, picked up a skill or two from every job I had, and made myself very marketable.

Explored a lot of various walks of life and ended up settling into metal working by chance. Didn't know I had the talent for it, or love it so much! Led into an instructor position at a small academy that trains incoming workers for a shipyard and the rest is history.

Always thought I'd be a writer or get into Law when I was in high school. Never stop learning, no matter how old you become.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Juney’s Answer

I'm a programmer by degree, a game producer / project manager / business developer by trade, and an organisational nut by nature.

During university, I thought I wanted to be in the computer science space, and somehow thought being a software engineer was the only valid route. Turns out, there are many more flavours available, and all experience I'd been gaining organising events in online games (from MMO guilds/raids to web-based scavenger hunts) and offline (career events to conferences) was naturally setting me up for a more organisational role in the game industry. I use my Computer Science BSc. and Game & Media Technology MSc. degrees daily, as well as all networked relationships & organisational experience I gained on the side, but only to inform my unrelated role on the business side.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jessica’s Answer

Choosing a major in college is an important decision but it often doesn't actually directly relate to the career you end up in. It's not as important as it once was and you can go to grad school and change careers. What will never stop being important is curiosity, desire to learn, and the ability to pivot and be flexible as life and career opportunities come your way.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Amy’s Answer

You should never feel locked into a career field due to your major, rather your major should just provide you with a foundation from which to leap.
I was a Business/Finance major which did provide me with a valuable foundation to start my career. However, over the span of my career I have worked in Financial Planning, Sales, Human Resources, and Marketing fields. This breadth of experience versus a more linear path has afforded me opportunities to continue to explore my interests which are ever-changing. And I am never bored!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Allegra’s Answer

Hi Anna,

Choosing a major can feel like you are locking yourself into a future career, but know that many times, it will simply help to guide you towards your potential interests and give you a place to start. I was a communications major in college and now work in the corporate social impact space. I enjoyed my major because it gave me an opportunity to learn about many industries and career paths. Good luck!
0
0
Updated