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How does one devise a plan for what to do right after college?

As I know what major I’m getting into already (business administration), I realize I don’t know how/what job searching looks like after graduating. Do you simply add it to your resume and call it a day? Or are there more steps to take afterwards?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Chirayu’s Answer

Devise a plan for what to do after college can be an overwhelming task, but it's essential to start thinking about it early on to increase your chances of success. Before you start searching for jobs, take some time to think about what you want to achieve in the short and long term. Write down your goals, such as landing a job in a specific industry or earning a certain salary. Start networking with professionals in your field of interest. Attend job fairs, join professional organizations, and connect with alumni from your college. Build relationships with people who can help you learn more about your desired industry and potentially provide job leads. Your resume and cover letter are your first impression to potential employers. Make sure they are well-written, error-free, and highlight your relevant skills and experiences. Use online job search engines, such as LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Indeed, or company career pages, to find job openings that match your skills and qualifications. Tailor your resume and cover letter for each job application. Once you start getting job interviews, prepare by researching the company and practicing common interview questions. Dress professionally and arrive early to show your eagerness and respect for the opportunity. After each job interview, send a thank-you email or note to show your appreciation and reinforce your interest in the position. In summary, job searching after college involves setting goals, networking, creating a strong resume and cover letter, applying for jobs, preparing for interviews, and following up. Remember that landing a job may take time and effort, but with persistence and patience, you can achieve your career goals.
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Fernando’s Answer

Job searches all start with figuring out what specific specialty of your field you want to break into. After you narrow it down it's all about researching companies and what jobs are on offer. Something you will gradually learn through the course of your time in college is what employers are looking for with regards to job candidates and the various positions you can apply for. Don't feel the need to overthink it early on, but due keep an eye on the types of jobs you wish to apply for and what it is they're looking for.
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Mercedes’s Answer

It is never too early to plan ahead. Definitely use the Career Center and Employment Office at your college. Or a similar professional/employment office to help you find opportunities. Another activity that helped me is join a student professional organization at your college, which will help your networking. If at all possible, seek employment opportunities (part-time or volunteer) to help identify your interest. Business Administration is a wide topic and there are many opportunities.
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sharyl’s Answer

Career choices begin long before graduation. Know what difference you want to make and then start looking for partners you are seeking in your journey. You interview employers long before the actual resume stage. Remember, the majority of employment is a result of networking and being suggested than a cold employment cycle.
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Katherine’s Answer

Things to keep in mind:

1. There's a rough rule that for every $10,000 a year you hope to make in your job, expect that it could take a month to find a job that would pay that well, so if you're looking for a $60,000 a year job, whether you're in your 40s or you're just out of college, expect that you might be looking and not have found what you hope for yet until you've been looking for 6 months. So just because you've graduated, you might still want to plan on having whatever job/s you worked at during college, or plan that you might get a job or two or three just to pay bills while you're searching, and see about arranging your finances to allow you to live with the idea that you'd be job hunting for 6 months (or however long depending on what salary you're looking for). ...And so, you might also be job hunting for your $60,000 salary for the last 6 months of school so you might have a chance to find something pretty good soon after you graduate.

2. The way many successful people are getting connected to jobs these days includes having your LinkedIn profile looking good and then getting with recruiters who look at your LinkedIn profile and send you jobs to apply for.
For example, here is one LinkedIn post from Kristy Bonner, who was a pro at using LinkedIn to work with recruiters. Here's what she wrote:

"Want RECRUITERS to contact YOU on LinkedIn?
Then do the following:

1. Make sure your headline is an actual
job title.
2. Make sure you have an “About”
section.
3. Make sure you have relevant
keywords in your “About” section.
4. Make sure you have All-Star status.
5. Make sure your photo is professional.

But most importantly….

6. Make sure you are actively
ENGAGING on the platform.
The algorithm has the power to suppress or elevate profiles based on engagement.

So:
Put a like on posts.
Write an insightful comment of at least one full sentence.
Like your own comment (get over it!)
Like and reply to other meaningful comments.
Engagement needs to be consistent.
You can monitor your daily profile view activity via “Profile Views.”
If you want to get something out of this platform, you need to put something in first.
You reap what you sow, as the saying goes.
Anything to add, please?
Kirsty Bonner
KB india

3. There are books out there that can help you with job search skills if you need them or aren't sure if you've learned good ones somewhere along in your life, whether from parents or school or whatever. Some that are currently more popular are The Unspoken Rules by Gorick Ng and The Proximity Principle by Ken Coleman.
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Doug’s Answer

Just start writing! Get a pad of paper, ignore the laptop for now. And start writing everything you want to do in life.

The goal is to find something you want to do not necessarily what you ‘should’ do. If it’s something you want to do, that will give you the energy to work hard for success.

If it’s something that you feel you should do, (family pressure, or society). It might work but you’ll be out worked by the person who really wants to do it.

But just start doing something and ideas of how to refine what you want will come. Good luck!
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Tammy’s Answer

I agree with Erica’s answer. It’s definitely a great idea to get to know the people in your career center at your college as they will be able to help you prepare for jobhunting and offer services to assist with that process both now and after you graduate. In our career center they have opportunities to help you explore career pass resources to help with interviews and résumé building. I’m sure your college has the same. It’s never too early to visit the center to start. You may wanna consider doing some internships or spending some time shadowing current professionals in the field to get a sense of what they do. Those may help you understand which path you would like to pursue for your own career.

Secondly, there may be some other things to consider post-college like where will you live? Are you willing to move out of the area for a job? If you took out student loans during college, you’ll have six months of time before you’ll have to start paying those back so starting a budget now is also a wise choice. Will there be a need to go on and get a masters degree or higher now or later in your career? If so you might want to consider when would be the best timing to apply to graduate programs and how much time you want to take off to work in between doing so as well.

Talk to the professors at your school. It’s likely that many of them had experience in the field before coming to work at the college and may be able to give you some insight into what path they took. Go to job fairs and reach out to people you know in the field already. And remember that whatever job you decide on now does not have to be the job you do for the rest of your life. In fact the first job you have out of college will probably be a stepping stone to the bigger path you’re on.
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Tricia’s Answer

Do you have clarity on how you want to put your degree to use? What do you like about your field of study and what are you good at (solving problems, understanding issue and paths to address, working in teams, leading, driving change, etc.), if you don’t know — spend time getting clarity before putting your resume together and looking for jobs. If you need help to get clarity, ask trusted sources (people who know you and your capabilities and will be honest with you), such as instructors, family, friends, coaches, mentors, etc. Spend time on this as it should help you in how you identify the job(s) you want, how you capture your skills, and how you present yourself in your resume, and interviews.

For my initial path, my degree was in advertising. The easy path would have been to work for an ad agency, but my passion was college sports, and I was good at the creative process. I ended up getting into sport’s marketing at my local university (interning for free part-time while working at another job part-time). I eventually earned a salaried position at the university. 😊
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Nathaniel’s Answer

Just like with a pregnancy, the 9 months prior to the pregnancy is the most important. By the time you hit your senior year, you might have worked a summer or two at a business similar to what you really want to pursue. So you are focused on what you need to get better at. You have people at school who have contacts that can steer you in a good direction. Right after my doctorate degree, I immediately went into an associateship and then got to run an entire office two months after my graduation. You don't take off and travel the world. It would help if you showed your first employer how excited you are to finally express your drive and dedication to what it is. you went to school for. If you are still unsure of your direction, go into a service-related field. This will keep you grounded and feel good about yourself as you figure things out.
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Erica’s Answer

Hi, Manomay,

That is a good question! Your college will likely have a career center to help you. In addition, there might be an alumni organization that can help you network.

An important element of finding a job is crafting a strong cover letter and resume. The career center will be a big help with this task.

Finally, look for networking opportunities in your community. For example, many cities have a Young Professionals group.
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Eileen’s Answer

Start early and decide what you want to do, whether it is to get a job or go on to school. Then, ask your advisor(s) for assistance and check in with peers. And, do alot of research and network, network, network!
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Michael’s Answer

Like many of the previous answers, it is important to start early. The more research and work you put into it, the more you understand what to expect. Career planning in itself is a full-time job. The more research you conduct utilizing many of the methods called out in the previous responses will help you better understand what you are prepared for. Once you find the role that interests you, it is important to begin understanding the organizations that you would like to target. It is important to target organizations that you would like to work for. What is the company or organization culture that you can identify with? Is it going to be a good fit for you? Understanding many of these components can help you find meaningful experiences that can lead to a career. IF you just add it to a resume and just call it a day, you are likely to just find a job and not a career.
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Namrata’s Answer

Hi ,

Planning starts a little early, the time you are already in college and taking your classes. Based on the courses you have taken you should get a more or less clear idea on what you would like to pursue further. Whether you want to study more like a degree post graduation or you want to work.

1) If you are planning to study further your plan will constitute of the names and departments of Universities that offer you the degree. What are the application processes, where do you see yourself after 2-4 years of research, how you can bring changes or effect the current situation towards better tomorrow.
2) If you are planning to work right after college you need to build your network via LinkedIn etc. You need to talk to peers and alumni who have followed the same path. Your plan will include everything from applying to job listings , talk to people online, make new connections with people sharing the same interest as yours. You also need to decide which city/state you want to work, its expenditures etc.

These should be the first steps in your plan and it goes further as you clear each one out of your way !!!
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David’s Answer

When just graduating from school, you will usually have limited experience that can be identified on a resume. If a company is hiring applicants right out of college, they understand that. As you target a company and/or a position, put the most relevant experience, classes or training that would apply at the top. You want to catch their attention quickly. Most hiring managers go over many resumes and look closely at the top but may or may not look all the way through. Sell yourself but be truthful with your resume. Also, do research on the company. Understand their products, finances and anything that you could bring up if you are invited to an interview. That will give you some advantage over someone who does not know or understand the company they are interviewing with.
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Kathryn’s Answer

The journey begins now. Most colleges have a department for internships. Make this apart of your college selection process. Reach out to the department, ask for a list of companies visiting the college for your area of interest. Now you have an idea of the kinds of companies you could potentially work for. Use your internships as opportunities to learn more about your area of interest and the company. At the end of the day, is this a company you would like to work for after graduation? If so, express your interest to everyone and make sure your supervisor is aware. Fingers crossed, you will already have a job in hand as you walk across the stage to receive your diploma. Good Luck to you!
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