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Can I get in med-school or dental school with a biochemistry degree?

I'm considering in getting biochemistry for my major, but I'm not sure of what I want to study. I want to be a dentist, but I'm also interested in cardio thoracic surgery and I haven't decide what to do yet. I'm also thinking in not declaring until my sophomore year in college.

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Shannon’s Answer

Absolutely! Pursuing a major in biochemistry is a fantastic choice, especially if you're passionate about entering the healthcare field. Not only does it provide you with a strong foundation in essential subjects like biology, anatomy, and physiology, but it also opens up so many exciting opportunities and avenues for growth. By studying biochemistry, you'll be equipped with the knowledge and skills to make a real difference in people's lives, no matter which aspect of healthcare you ultimately decide to focus on. Your enthusiasm and dedication will undoubtedly lead to great accomplishments in your future career.
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Steven’s Answer

Dentistry to cardiothoracic surgery is quite a spread! I think any medical school or dental school would be fine with a biochem major--so long as you finish your degree. Likewise, I doubt many universities would make you declare a major before your sophomore year anyway. One thing that will stand you in good stead when you get to the point of applying to medical or dental school is some related experience. For instance you might consider looking for almost any job or volunteer position in a dental or medical office or facility--especially if it gives you the opportunity to observe and learn about how these facilities operate from the inside.
Be open to new experiences, and don't be afraid to change your mind. I was myself considering becoming a periodontist, but I decided only during my general practice residency that it probably wasn't for me. And I know of an orthodontist who after practicing several years went to law school and became a malpractice attorney, while keeping his orthodontic practice!
Don't be rushed into a narrow career path too early, and good luck!
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Deborah’s Answer

You can ask these questions of your guidance counselor or whomever at your school is helping you make college choices. They should be able to steer you at least a little bit in the right direction. Then when you interview at colleges, ask these questions.
Until then, a biochemistry major is going to have some foundational coursework, which should help you refine your choices of what you want to do. You will also have professors and teaching assistants you can ask. The world of biochemistry is getting pretty big these days, meaning there are lots of ways to use this degree. I would imagine you definitely could get into med school with this degree. Good luck, and great job being proactive.
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LaTausha’s Answer

You can get into med school or dental school with any degree as long as you take the required classes for the respective schools. Most people do science majors becasue the curriculum usually cover all required classes and a bunch of additional science classes that may or may not be of interest. Being a science major also puts you around the right network for organziations, volunteering, internships, and testing information. Take time to explore your options before narrowing down. You don't have to have it all figured out just yet.
Good luck
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Rafeh’s Answer

To pursue a career in medicine and attend medical school, you will need to complete several essential steps. Firstly, you must write and achieve a competitive score on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), which will assess your knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts, as well as your critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.

In addition to the MCAT, you must also complete the relevant prerequisite courses required by the medical schools you are interested in applying to. These courses may vary slightly between institutions, but generally include subjects such as biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and mathematics. It is important to research the specific requirements for each school and plan your undergraduate coursework accordingly.

While any major is acceptable for medical school, it is essential to ensure that you meet the medical school's specific course requirements in your chosen field of study. Some students opt for a science-related major to better prepare for the rigorous medical school curriculum, but ultimately, your undergraduate degree should be in a subject that genuinely interests you and aligns with your career goals.

Throughout this demanding journey, remember to remain positive and never lose hope. Do not allow others to dictate your path or discourage you from pursuing your dreams. Establishing a support system and connecting with mentors in the field can be invaluable in maintaining motivation and accessing helpful resources.

Additionally, prioritize self-care and take care of both your physical and mental well-being. Allocate time for breaks, relaxation, exercise, and engaging in hobbies and activities that bring you joy. This will not only help to prevent burnout but also contribute to your overall success as a future medical professional.

In summary, to successfully pursue medical school and achieve your aspirations in medicine, you must prepare for and excel at the MCAT, complete the necessary prerequisite courses, choose a compatible degree, and maintain a strong sense of determination and self-belief. Moreover, remember to prioritize your health and well-being to ensure you can continue working towards your dreams.
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