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What are the best jobs for college students looking to pay for tuition?

I'm asking because college is expensive and I'm wondering if there are any jobs out there that are perfect for busy full-time students besides work study. Preferably anything online. Personal experience is super helpful. I appreciate the guidance.
#college-jobs #college #college-advice #college-major #college-bound #higher-education #work-life-balance #online-job #working-from-home #work #job-search #job-coaching #career #jobs

Thank you comment icon Thank you for your advice! Mireia

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Subject: Career question for you

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Pieter’s Answer

Hi Mireia --


Graduating from college with no or minimal debt is a great way to start your career. And working during college can be a great way to get experience that helps you choose your direction and build your resume. Personally I was able to pay for college by working, so I'll answer from that perspective and suggest a few ways to reframe the question.


TL;DR: The best jobs may be paid summer internships related to your major, and/or a company that you start on your own selling the skills you've already developed.


1. Find work related to your major. It'll build your resume, and you'll be more hirable. One reason many employers hire college students is to build their pipeline of students who will want to work for them after graduation. It'll give you connections to people in your industry.


2. Find work that doesn't interfere with your studies. And where your studies won't interfere with work. Don't underestimate how much energy and focus working can consume. It's nice to have sleep and homework completed. My first job in college was working evenings in graphics for a publishing house. I was considering that as a major, loved the job but it took way too many hours.


3. Consider internships or college cooperative study programs. In engineering, I worked alternate semesters as an engineer in training, which was a great experience.


4. Find work that is paid. There are many unpaid opportunities, but the goal here to pay for college. Paid work can be found, and can often be more meaningful work to the company.


5. Find work that builds your public profile. Work that appears in publications, GitHub, websites, Instagram, etc. allow you to build your own reputation.


6. Consider making a job rather than taking one. You may be able to start your own practice or business. You'd likely be surprised how many businesses, particularly smaller ones are willing and happy to contract work to college students. From your perspective its well paid but from theirs its inexpensive and a chance to get defined tasks done without taking on payroll. You can control your work, hours, and having your own business is phenomenal on your resume at graduation. Plus at college you have lots of smart people around you willing to work for low cost, which can help you scale.


7. Actively search. Let people know you're searching. The best job will likely be at a company you haven't yet heard of. Most opportunities aren't published, and a lot come from 2nd order connections. Have parents/friends forward your resume. Keep your LinkedIn profile and resume short and simple. Post your resume at co working sites, where there are startups that have work but no staffs.


Other things to consider:


-- You'll be paid more after graduation than now. Earning $10,000 now might sound great but if it delays graduation a year that could cost you say $40,000 in lost opportunity .


-- Consider state university (if you're not already in college). It's way easier to earn $20,000 to cover tuition than $60,000.


Best of success!

Pieter

Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your advice! Mireia
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Ken’s Answer

College can be expensive, but there are ways that you can economize and balance your life so that you can make it work. Many colleges have coop and internship programs that are connected to your major that allow you to earn and learn along the way. Your guidance counselor and academic adviser can help help you to locate such opportunities. I supervised coop students who worked alternating quarters and were able to get practical application of their studies and earn money along the way.

If you are to work in college it would be best to get a job that is related to your major. Your academic adviser and the dean of your major and your professors may be good sources of information. Many times you can get a job related to your major on campus.

Ken recommends the following next steps:

Here are some tips on how to make college less expensive: http://www.educationplanner.org/students/paying-for-school/ways-to-pay/reduce-college-costs.shtml
Here are some tips on how to balance life in college, so that you might be able to work and earn: https://www.unigo.com/in-college/college-experience/creating-a-workschool-balance-a-college-student-perspective http://www.mycollegesuccessstory.com/academic-success-tools/college-life-balance.html http://www.collegeconfidential.com/dean/000241/
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your advice! Mireia
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Karina’s Answer

Hi,

Here are some online freelance job opportunities that could be explored:

1. CACTUS (Academic Editing, Translation, etc.) - https://jobs.cactusglobal.com/jobs
2. Freelance Editor at PaperTrue - https://blog.papertrue.com/hiring-freelance-editors/?_ga=2.103495360.1919610458.1637679794-1277255074.1637679793
3. TranscribeMe (Transcription, Translation, Annotation, etc.]) - https://workhub.transcribeme.com/Account/Register
4. Rev Freelance Jobs (Transcriptionist/Captioner) - https://www.rev.com/freelancers
5. DataForce Community - https://www.transperfect.com/dataforce/community
6. Smartling Translator - https://www.smartling.com/translator_information/
7. Chegg Subject Matter Expert - https://www.cheggindia.com/qa-experts/sign-up/
8. Appen Part-time Jobs - https://appen.com/join-our-crowd/part_time

Hope this helps.
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Daniel’s Answer

Hi, I think it's great that you want to work to pay off any debts you incur prior to leaving college or before getting into the work field. A good job I think would be something work from home so you can save some time not driving in traffic and use that time to study or to do school work when you have breaks. Work from home jobs pay a lot more than they used to pay and can help save time with traffic. The job could pay enough to help pay off loans as well.
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Rachel’s Answer

Consider a work-study program where you can run the desk at the gym or library and study during down-time.
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Shawn’s Answer

Hello Mireia. It is great to think ahead. I would suggest that before you think about jobs think about how you can pay for college that will lessen the cost. Perhaps going to a Junior College first and then transferring will help. Also, apply for all the scholarships that you can apply for to help reduce the costs. As far as jobs are concerned I would say look for jobs that are online and that you can do from a laptop. You can also look for different ways to make additional income like surveys or Fiverr. I wish you the best in your future endeavors in school.
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YU’s Answer

You question has some misinterpretation in there. My understanding is that you are looking for a high-pay job for a person with only high-school diploma (since you have not graduated form college). My suggestion is to find a job that can help your resume, not your wallet.


I worked in hospital ER for night shift during medical school. I also worked for research lab during graduate school. Depending on your major, you can easily find remote or onsite "job" that fits your interest. For example, my niece is in young-kid education major in UT. She works on weekend for a local daycare play.

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Richard’s Answer

Making enough money to make a dent in state private school tuition or even some university tuition can be difficult. In fact, it can even be detrimental if your job takes so much time away from your studies, that your grades suffer. It may be better to focus on decreasing your expenses.

If you can keep your expenses down (live with parents, attend community college which can be free in some cities, complete your degree at an inexpensive public institution etc) debt doesn't have to be out of control. However the typical student does not do everything they can to decrease expenses then has to be stressed during their first years of your career.

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