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What careers and jobs are available for me if i am interested in mathematics?


Mathematics is a good field to apply to many other fields of study. If you are interested in math, then I think you would be able to do great in many other things outside. Just choose what you would like the most: I highly believe that you would be able to do it more effectively compared to people who are not interested in math. You have the theories, but others don't. Junhyuck J.

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Donna’s Answer

“The work of science is to substitute facts for appearances and demonstrations for impressions.” -Ruskin

The above is the motto of the Society of Actuaries. If it appeals to you and you enjoy mathematics, think about becoming an actuary.
A strong affinity for mathematics can take you in many different career directions. I will concentrate on becoming an actuary.

I recently retired from a 40 year career as a pension actuary in the US. I majored in mathematics and political science. I always loved mathematics. I also loved studying (pretty weird) and learning. When I graduated all I knew was that I wanted to pursue mathematics. I thought about getting an advanced degree but wanted to be on my own first and not go directly to graduate school. Randomly, I heard about the actuarial profession and what I heard interested me very much. I liked the idea that the career required further study and that I could work and study at the same time. And what was really appealing was that many employers would support my efforts by providing study time at work and reimbursement for the cost of exams I passed as well as bonuses and/or salary increases for passing.

The exams and course of study is very challenging and requires a lot of studying beyond the times provided at work. But for me, I liked the challenge. Also, my first job was at a large insurance company and there were 100 of us taking one exam or another and the camaraderie of that was a comfortable transition from college life.

Various organizations offer professional designation, such as Fellow of the Society of Actuaries, upon completion of a syllabus. In the US, the two main organizations are the Society of Actuaries (life, health and pensions) and the Casualty Actuarial Society (property and casualty). In India, there is the Institute of Actuaries in India and in the UK there is the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. If interested, you should look at the various websites for tons of information on actuarial careers and how to gain your professional designation. When I took the Society of Actuaries exam back in the 1970's there were 9 exams and it took me 5 years to complete, which was considered a fairly fast pace. The exams at that were given every 6 months and the more advanced ones only once a year. It is common to need to take a particular exam more than once. Things have changed a lot since then as I believe than now there are courses as well as exams but it still takes a lot of effort and time to get through the syllabus.

I spent most of my career in pension consulting at large employee benefits consulting firms. In the US that required being certified as an Enrolled Actuary (separate requirements). For me, this was a simple by-product of passing the Society of Actuaries exams in the pension specialty but that has changed to require some separate testing. I am not sure exactly how this works today.

What I liked most about my career as an actuary is that it is essential to financial well-being of society. Managing and evaluating risk is what actuaries do. Sound assumptions and practices are essential and that takes training and adherence to best practices. Day to day my work was always challenging. Being bored at work was a rare occurrance. Actuaries can follow many different directions - - more mathematical as those who do modeling, more people focused as those who get involved in benefit calculations and plan design. One can be very technically focused or more marketing/new business focused. One can get involved in project management or people management. I was involved for many years in developing training programs for junior staff. At the end of my career, I worked remotely and worked with a small team that reviewed every new pension plan that came to our firm to make sure we could match the results from the prior actuarial firm that had handled the plan.

I never ended up with an advanced degree in mathematics but my career allowed me to have a formal education that trained me for an exciting field that provides valuable services to all of us as it teaches sound approaches in the management of risky situations.

Donna recommends the following next steps:

Check out the websites of an actuarial professional organization (such as SOA, CAS, IAI, or IFoA)
Explore insurance or consulting firms about possible internships. But be sure to understand how much mentoring you will receive as sometimes those can result in boring experiences.
Take courses in probability and statistics, financial modeling, data analysis and see about taking any of the exams on the syllabus. Best to take the exams as close as possible to completing the course.

Nice to see another actuary promoting the profession on this site! Mark Berquist

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Stacey’s Answer

A very common career path for mathematicians is to work in Risk functions for large companies. In order to calculate risk for a company alot of mathematical modeling is needed to assess the propensity of certain things happening based on actions or decisions the company makes. I've seen many people with a math background, who have experience with modeling, do well in Risk. If coding is more where you are strong then mathematicians can find good careers in the analytic or research functions of organizations, modeling big data or running statistical analyses. Another option for mathematics is to go into the Finance function. A CPA is not needed to be successful in Finance, especially in the Finance Planning and Analytics arm of a Finance organization. In these functions the work is more about understanding where the company stands on expense and revenue, possibly running analyses to calculate revenue projections or determine where to make future investments to drive growth. Lastly, a mathematician could pair their degree with a business or economics background and use that to get a job in a corporate strategy team or in product management.

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Aashish’s Answer

Business analytics is a field that requires large numbers of talented employees and is a field with significant future potential. Agree with Betsey - it is a flexible degree and one that could be leveraged across a very wide spectrum of fields.

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Raghunath’s Answer

Hey Ritvik,

Mathematics being the fundamental element of science, opportunities are countless. There are a lot of areas that can be of your interest, I can cover one area of Mathematics with Information Tech.

This era has made Data as the most valuable asset, analytics on the data to help decision making is an area that is in demand.
In the industry, people who do analytics are called Data Analysts, Data Scientists, Statistical Analysts, Data Engineers and so on.

Raghunath recommends the following next steps:

Do some google research on jobs that are posted on these roles from big Tech companies like Google, Apple, Facebook etc, that will help you understand what kind of tasks they do and how they help decision making.

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John’s Answer

Rewarding mathematics jobs are available in an array of companies and organizations Ritvik.

FOUR CAREER PATHS IN MATHEMATICS

A postsecondary education in mathematics provides a variety of career paths. Most math careers go far beyond just crunching numbers, they're challenging, interesting and provide a good salary. Some careers focus on mathematical research and education, whereas others use mathematics and its applications to build and improve work in finance, sciences, manufacturing, business, engineering and communications. Some mathematicians work in fields such as climate study, astronomy and space exploration, national security, medicine, animated films and robotics. The Federal Government, mainly in the U.S. Department of Defense, employs many mathematicians. Some working for the Federal Government work for the National Institute of Standards and Technology or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

ACTUARY – Becoming an insurance actuary requires a bachelor's degree in a math-related program such as economics, statistics, or finance. Other programs that aspiring insurance actuaries might concentrate on are mathematics, actuarial science, and business. The integral role that an actuary has in insurance companies stems from their risk assessment research. This research helps them forecast how likely it is for certain risk events to occur and how these events will impact their company with potential loss.
• EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENT – While having a Bachelor's degree and a strong background in math is paramount, insurance actuaries may find the exams that they need to pass to be the most challenging and time consuming aspect of their educational requirements. Similar to an attorney, an insurance actuary needs to pass several exams in order to advance in their career. Through these exams, many of which can be taken while already employed, they are able to achieve different levels of professional designation.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Actuary salary in the United States is $82,600 as of May 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $75,000 and $92,900. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

COMMERCIAL PILOT – An airline pilot operates a plane's engines and controls to navigate and fly the vessel. He or she also checks hydraulic and engine systems for pre-flight safety and monitors fuel consumption and aircraft systems in-flight. Prospective pilots must satisfy a set number of flying hours and be in good physical and mental health to fly an airline carrier. Pilots must deal with possible hazards, such as jet lag, fatigue, and unfavorable weather conditions. However, they also might get to travel all over the world. The skills you'll need for this career include strong communication, problem solving and observation skills, good depth perception and reaction time, and the ability to operate aircraft computer and navigation systems.
• EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENT – While a college degree is not always required to get started in this career field, the BLS reports that airline pilots are required to have a bachelor's degree, which can be in any major. However, aspiring pilots can gain more relevant knowledge by enrolling in an aviation or aeronautics bachelor's program. Regardless of major, students must complete coursework in physics, aeronautical engineering, mathematics, and English. It's important to enroll in an aviation or aeronautics program that has been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Pilot salary in the United States is $132,000 as of May 28, 2020. The range for our most popular Pilot positions typically falls between $66,900 and $197,500. Keep in mind that salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including position, education, certifications, additional skills, and the number of years you have spent in your profession.

OPERATIONS RESEARCH ANALYSTS – Use their quantitative reasoning skills and ability to think critically, solve complex problems, and provide solutions. Companies hire operations research analysts to improve their business practices by performing a variety of tasks, such as studying cost effectiveness, labor requirements, product distribution, and other factors involved in their day-to-day operations. An analyst may be a full-time member of a company's staff or hired just to handle special projects on a contractual basis through consulting firms. Many work hours may be spent sitting at a desk and overtime might sometimes be required.
• EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENT – For an entry-level position as an operations research analyst, a minimum of a bachelor's degree, such as the Bachelor of Science in Mathematical Sciences and Operations Science, is required. Develop key skills through relevant coursework. Operations research analysts will need logical thinking capabilities. Students can include classes in operations research, statistical analysis, mathematics, and computer science in their elective coursework. Be sure to also include several computer courses such as, but not limited to, Microsoft Visual Basic, C++, and SQL.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Operations Research Analyst salary in the United States is $67,900 as of May 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $59,900 and $76,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

STATISTICIAN– A statistician works for various companies interpreting data and making estimates and hypotheses, among other tasks. These professionals must be adroit in statistical mathematics and software, usually requiring at least a master's degree in their field, and many research positions demand a doctorate. Statisticians use their numerical skills to analyze data for corporations, government agencies and other organizations for a variety of purposes. While some jobs are available to those with a bachelor's degree, most positions require the completion of graduate schooling.
• EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENT – According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, some jobs with the federal government are available to individuals with a bachelor's degree in statistics or mathematics. Undergraduate programs offer students the option of majoring in mathematical or applied statistics. These curricula include coursework in statistics and other advanced mathematics, such as calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. Computer programming, software and science courses are typically required as well.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Statistician II salary in the United States is $74,900 as of May 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $66,000 and $89,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Ritvik the demand for mathematics experts has grown exponentially in a number of careers—and so has the interest in these jobs. According to the Mathematical Association of America, math professions are becoming increasingly attractive. In fact, mathematician, actuary, and statistician jobs are among the most promising career paths based on their income levels, growth outlook, and low-stress work environments.

Hope this was Helpful Ritvik

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Sonal’s Answer

Hi Ritvik,

I am a Data Scientist and have a lot of Mathematics graduates as my fellow co-workers. I think data science is a very good fit for Math majors. I am not sure, if this would fit your liking exactly - but I will share with you my experience in this field and some tips on getting started, if indeed this interests you.

From my experience in this field, I think I can divide the skill set to become a data scientist into three areas - Core skills (Mathematics/Statistics and programming), Business Problem Solving (acquired over time and working on real time projects in a specific industry), Communication (both written and verbal).

While you keep this framework in mind, I would also like to point you to resources - First, as a beginner, you could start out by participating in some Kaggle competitions. These give you experience in working on a near-real-life projects and being a community based platform - you will also get a lot of exposure to other people's way of thinking and problem solving. For coding, if you are new to it - you could start with online learning. I found Datacamp tutorials to be super useful. You can also start with any other online courses you feel more comfortable with.

Hope this gives you a good career option to look into. Enjoy Mathematics!

Best,
Sonal

Sonal recommends the following next steps:

Participate in a Kaggle competition

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Andrei’s Answer

I'd say: pretty much anything that requires thinking. Mathematics is not a science, it is a way of thinking straight and with minimal flaws.
Try professions where thinking is not an add-on, but the main requirement: consulting, engineering, finance, sales, marketing, data analytics.

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Jiahong’s Answer

From my experience, if you're a math major, working with data is going to your best bet at finding a job fast. So positions like Data Analyst, Data Scientists. It's highly unlikely to use deep math theories, complex equations in companies but being a Data Analyst and Data scientist allow you to use critical math thinking skills.

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Padmapriya’s Answer

Hi Ritvik,

Great question. I have done my master's in Mathematics.

Almost every job involves math to some extent, though the type of math used in jobs can vary from basic addition and subtraction to complex algebra and inferential statistics. Math skills are clearly important in many careers, most notably the science, technology, and engineering professions.

A major in mathematics is a springboard to a wide range of rewarding careers. Whether you focus on theoretical mathematics or applied math, the analytical and quantitative skills you develop in a math program are valuable assets that many employers need.

Some of the careers are:
Cryptographer.
Mathematician.
Economist.
Actuary.
Financial planner.
Investment analyst.
Statistician.
Operations research analyst.

Hope this helps. All the best!!

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Anumeha’s Answer

If you love maths, career options abound. Maths is an essential skill for most science and technology jobs.
You could choose to be a continuous learner and take up research in the field or you could join the industry.
As you keep progressing, think about what areas within maths are of most interest to you.
For example, as I loved probability and statistics since the time it was introduced to me, it has helped me better appreciate statistical modeling work. Strong foundations in matrix algebra make for good machine learning basics, geometry is essential to civil engineering, arithmetic in accounting, etc.

Anumeha recommends the following next steps:

Think about specific areas within Mathematics that are particularly interesting to you
Take part in olympiads, mathletes and other interest groups

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JAYAKRISHNAN’s Answer

You can select a large number of career option if you are good at maths, a few are listed below
Investment banking
Risk Analytics
Financial Engineering
FP&A
Economics etc .

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Vineeth’s Answer

Some of the Careers are

• Statistician
• Mathematician
• Operations Research Analyst
• Actuary
• Data Analyst/ Business Analyst
• Economist
• Market Researcher
• Psychometrician

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sushma’s Answer

1. Statistician
2. Mathematician
3. Operations Research Analyst
4. Actuary
5. Data Analyst/ Business Analyst/ Big Data Analyst
6. Market Researcher

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Kimberly’s Answer

I started off as a math major at USC, and there are many career paths for mathematics including statistics, economics, and data science (which is now the highest paying field for new college grads). Plus there are many scholarships for college students in the STEM field.
My cousin graduated with a math bachelors degree from UC Davis and is now a high school math teacher. She loves teaching math especially because many girls think that math is too hard, so she loves helping them excel and go into fields that require math.

Kimberly recommends the following next steps:

Conduct informational interviews with professionals to learn if their career is interesting for you.

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Surendra Reddy’s Answer

The demand for mathematics experts has grown exponentially in a number of careers—and so has the interest in these jobs. According to the Mathematical Association of America, math professions are becoming increasingly attractive. In fact, mathematician, actuary, and statistician jobs are among the most promising career paths based on their income levels, growth outlook, and low-stress work environments.

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Eric’s Answer

As many other people have suggested Data Scientist or Data Analyst are good careers for a mathematician. In addition to the pure application of math it will also be beneficial to understand requirements analysis and presentation skills. You want to be able to apply some domain expertise, understand the true ask of your "customer", and present the data in a way that is consumable and makes sense.

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Venkatesh’s Answer

Statistician. ...
Mathematician. ...
Operations Research Analyst. ...
Actuary. ...
Data Analyst/ Business Analyst/ Big Data Analyst. ...
Economist. ...
Market Researcher. ...
Psychometrician.

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anubhav’s Answer

Data Scientist (Technology) -
Some of the top data scientists are mathematicians. The ability to work with number, identify patterns and grasp models and algorithms is already tuned if you have background in maths and helps you abstract problems and solve them.
In addition to DS, a maths major has lot of potential in any profession where data/stats are required:

Economist
Data Analyst
Business Analyst
Finance

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Avinash’s Answer

Hi Ritvik,

One career option would be Data or Research Analyst.

Data Analysts use mathematical skills and analytical methods to solve complex issues in business, address inefficiencies and make strategic decisions. They frequently use statistical tools to interpret data sets and prepare reports for the leadership team to communicate business trends, patterns and predictions.

Hope it helps!!

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Sue’s Answer

Mathematics is the fundamental to all Science and Engineering fields so the opportunity is huge. The skills you required from study can be used in many areas. I believe once you start the study, you will be guided to explore different areas. Then you can decide what to pursued for your career.

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Betsey’s Answer

I personally did not major in mathematics, but based on friends and colleagues with math degrees it proves to be a very flexible degree. The analytical foundation it provides is highly desired. I have worked with/known math majors in risk, technology, product, banking, and more.

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Deepak’s Answer

You have many options, if you are interested in mathematics, you can try for chartered accountant, of become a professor, teach students maths, you also have options in share market

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Deepak’s Answer

You have many options, if you are interested in mathematics, you can try for chartered accountant, of become a professor, teach students maths, you also have options in share market

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Supreethkumar’s Answer

Scientist, Professor, careers related to most of the engineering fields.

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Satish’s Answer

Jobs You Can Get With a Math Degree:

College Math Professor
Actuary
Market Research Analyst
Economist
Financial Analyst

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Deepak’s Answer

As you are interested in mathematics, you can get into banking sector, opt for chartered accountant, or get into stock market, also can become a professor.

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JAYAKRISHNAN’s Answer

You can select a large number of career option if you are good at maths, a few are listed below
Investment banking
Risk Analytics
Financial Engineering
FP&A
Economics etc .

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Venkatesh’s Answer

Statistician. ...
Mathematician. ...
Operations Research Analyst. ...
Actuary. ...
Data Analyst/ Business Analyst/ Big Data Analyst. ...
Economist. ...
Market Researcher. ...
Psychometrician.

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Siddharth’s Answer

The world is pretty much your oyster! Math can serve as the foundation for a number of different career paths. I was an applied Math major myself, and my first job was in strategy consulting (where Math isn't a prerequisite, but a comfort with numbers definitely helped).

But with an education in Math, you could go down a bunch of different paths. Note that this isn't exhaustive, so there are many other roles that could be open for you:

1) You could do something where Math isn't the core requirement, but a comfort with numbers will definitely help. This could include things such as strategy consulting, investment banking, digital marketing, etc.
2) You could do something in the corporate world that's centered around Math/analytics: Data science, trading, risk, operations research. An affinity for Math could also translate to an affinity for programming, so you could examine roles within that genre too.
3) You could continue in academia, do a PhD

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Abhilash’s Answer

Mathematics is a subject which is not liked by many but is related to many careers . It can lead to career in CS, CA ,banking, finance ,ACTURY ,when combined with commerce subjects .With science it strengthens the chances of selection for Engineering, Architectures etc. Thus your career choices increase and the probability of getting into highly academic careers becomes high , when you excel in Mathematics .

If you are good in ONLY MATHEMATICS, then try to become an Actury . It is very well paying and makes you a professional like CA. You can also go towards pure academics courses like B.A ( Maths), B.Sc.(Maths) to be followed by PG in Mathematics . Here you can combine it with B.Ed and become a school teacher. If you wasn't to become a college lecturer then you need to study upto Ph.D, with NET I'm Mathematics. You can also become a research person , if that interests you.

NEXT is how good are you in Mathematics. If you are just good enough then you shall focus on becoming teacher or take up clerical examinations for bank and other govt agencies. But if you are very good then you must aim higher .

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Deepak’s Answer

Career Options in Applied Mathematics
Below is a sample list of some future choices to explore following studies in Applied Mathematics. This list is not exhaustive but it provides a solid idea of what fellow graduates have gone on to do and what potential careers an Applied Mathematics degree can offer. Some options are more directly associated with specific areas of Applied Mathematics than others.

Aerospace Engineer
Accountant
Actuary
Architect
Artificial Intelligence Designer
Bioinformatics Specialist
Biotechnician
Climatologist
Community/City Planner
Computer Security Analyst
Database Developer
Emergency Response and Disaster Analyst
Engineering Consultant
Entrepreneur
Environmental Scientist
Financial Analyst
Food Scientist
Forensic Specialist
Geneticist
Hardware Developer
Laboratory Technician
Logistics Specialist
Mathematician
Medical Technology Developer
National Security Analyst
Operations Director
Product Developer
Risk Analyst
Reliability Engineer
Researcher
Satellite Communications Specialist
Seismologist
Software Engineer/Developer
Systems Designer
Statistician
Technical Writer

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Shak’s Answer

A math degree can open many different career paths. Some of our most talented software developers are math majors. This would help in gathering metrics of websites and surfacing that knowledge to product teams to help them make improvements in parts of a software product.

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Priya’s Answer

Different math career options are as follows:

Actuaries
Computer and Information Research Scientists
Economists
Financial Analysts
Mathematicians
Operations Research Analysts
Postsecondary Teachers
Statisticians

All the best!

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Deepak’s Answer

As you are interested in mathematics, you can get into banking sector, opt for chartered accountant, or get into stock market, also can become a professor.

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