Skip to main content
6 answers
8
Updated 279 views

How do I compare and choose the school that is the best fit for me and my career?

I want to stay in Massachusetts and I plan to study advertising and marketing. I want to choose a good school that won't leave me in debt for thirty years when I get out of school. There are so many possibilities and it is diff ult to find the perfect fit. What main aspects should I be looking for in a school to help me thrive in my career?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

6 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Calvin’s Answer

Good question Victoria. I would suggest the following items to consider:

a) What college offers your specific major and the curriculum offered
b) What is your GPA and high school achievements? This will have a large impact to your financial aid package
c) Cost and Financial Aid Offered
d) College size - Do you want to graduate in 4 years, colleges with 20K+ students it might take 5-6 years to graduate due to the demand for classes, my son is going to a smaller college and he will graduate in 3 1/2 years
e) School Amenities and Student Services
f) School Culture, Values, and Beliefs
g) Do they offer a competitive graduate program if you choose to pursue a Master's degree in your field of study

I believe these are some critical items to review and discuss with your parents in order to help choose the best college fit for yourself.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jeremy’s Answer

I recommend identifying LinkedIn users who currently hold the roles you hope to hold in the future. From there you can browse through their experience and get an idea of what path might be best for you.
Thank you comment icon Thank you this is great advice! Victoria
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Aila’s Answer

I think school size makes a bigger difference than people imagine so that's definitely something to pay attention to. Small schools offer closer relationships with professors, more easily accessible research opportunities, and a unified school-wide community, but can also sometimes mean the student body is cliquey and there are fewer opportunities. Large schools may have cooler more robust programs, but they may also be more competitive because there is a larger student body.

Aila recommends the following next steps:

Write down things you do and don't like about your current school and see if that gives you ay guidance
Thank you comment icon Thanks, can't wait to put this advice into action! Victoria
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Cristina’s Answer

Hi Victoria! I recommend looking at the different majors/minors and courses available at each school. What courses excite you? Are there specific professors that you'd like to learn from?

It'd also be great to talk to current students and alumni at each of the schools. You could get their perspectives and hear more about how they navigated coursework, student life, extracurriculars, and anything else they can share about their journey!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Megan’s Answer

Choosing a college to attend is a major life decision, so kudos to you for thinking through the decision making process!

My dream school was out-of-state with a ton of state-of-the-art amenities and specialized niche programs that piqued my interest.

The college I ended up attending was an in-state school that gave me a very generous scholarship and financial aid package, had good amenities and resources, and was close enough to home that I had a support system should I choose to go back and see my family and friends there but far enough away that I could grow into my own person.

I'd say to choose a college based on some of the following factors:

Megan recommends the following next steps:

how much estimated debt would you graduate with and are you comfortable with that number as an investment in yourself
what degree you want to pursue and if the program, faculty, student orgs, and resources are there at the college to support you in that degree
reach out to alumni from those colleges to learn more about campus culture and what college was like for them
do people who go to that college and get that degree get hired and have job opportunities to choose from
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Keith’s Answer

The reality is as long as you get a piece of paper that shows that you’ve completed a specific field of study, you should be able to find a career in that field if you look hard enough. Now I will say that there are schools in programs within those schools that are prestigious. They come with a network. But, if you join industry groups, like the American banks Association, you could benefit from those very individuals who went to those same schools without the price tag. You just have to take the initiative to join the groups, ask questions and build relationships.
0