Skip to main content
5 answers
8
Updated 891 views

Sub-fields of Psychiatry...

While researching the career field, I found out that there are sub-fields of psychiatry. I am aware of the following:

- Addiction Psychiatry
- Geriatric Psychiatry
- Pediatric Psychiatry
- Neuropsychiatry

What do these sub-fields mean? Are there other sub-fields I should be aware of? How does one get into these fields?

Thank you comment icon Hi Trenity! These are fantastic questions! You might have better luck getting advice if you post one of these questions at a time. That way Professionals can give you advice on the parts they are able to answer. Thanks in advance for using CV! Alexandra Carpenter, Admin

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

5 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jacob’s Answer

Certainly, psychiatry offers various sub-specialties that focus on specific patient populations or areas of mental health. Here are some of the sub-fields you mentioned and additional ones to be aware of:

1. **Addiction Psychiatry:** Addiction psychiatrists specialize in treating individuals with substance use disorders. They help patients overcome dependencies on drugs or alcohol and address the underlying mental health issues contributing to addiction.

2. **Geriatric Psychiatry:** Geriatric psychiatrists work with older adults, typically age 65 and older, addressing mental health issues specific to this population, such as dementia, depression, and anxiety related to aging.

3. **Pediatric Psychiatry:** Pediatric psychiatrists specialize in the mental health of children and adolescents. They diagnose and treat conditions like ADHD, mood disorders, and behavioral disorders in young patients.

4. **Neuropsychiatry:** Neuropsychiatrists study the relationship between brain function and behavior. They diagnose and treat conditions where mental health symptoms are linked to neurological issues, such as traumatic brain injuries or epilepsy.

5. **Forensic Psychiatry:** Forensic psychiatrists evaluate individuals within the legal system, including defendants, witnesses, or victims, to assess mental health issues related to legal cases. They may testify in court as expert witnesses.

6. **Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry:** These psychiatrists work in hospital settings, providing psychiatric assessments and care to patients with medical conditions. They address the mental health aspects of physical illnesses.

7. **Psychosomatic Medicine:** This sub-field focuses on the connection between emotional and physical health. Psychosomatic psychiatrists treat patients with mental health issues that have a significant impact on their physical well-being.

8. **Public Psychiatry:** Psychiatrists in this field work in the public sector, often with underserved populations. They may work in community mental health centers, government agencies, or nonprofits.

9. **Emergency Psychiatry:** Emergency psychiatrists assess and provide crisis intervention for individuals experiencing acute mental health crises. They often work in emergency rooms or crisis intervention centers.

10. **Sleep Medicine:** Sleep psychiatrists diagnose and treat sleep disorders that impact mental health, such as insomnia, sleep apnea, or parasomnias.

To get into these sub-fields, psychiatrists typically follow these steps:

1. **Complete Psychiatry Residency:** Start with a general psychiatry residency program, which typically lasts four years. During this time, you'll gain core psychiatric skills and knowledge.

2. **Fellowship Training:** After residency, you can pursue additional fellowship training in your chosen sub-specialty. Fellowships can range from one to two years or longer, depending on the sub-field.

3. **Board Certification:** Become board-certified in your sub-specialty by meeting the specific requirements of that field's board. This often involves passing board exams and fulfilling clinical experience criteria.

4. **Network and Gain Experience:** During and after fellowship, network with colleagues in your chosen sub-field and gain experience through clinical practice, research, and staying up-to-date with advancements in the field.

Remember that choosing a sub-specialty is a significant decision. It's essential to explore your interests, talk to mentors in the field, and consider which population or area of psychiatry aligns best with your passion and career goals.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Candice’s Answer

Listed below are some of the most common fields of psychiatry and what they do. I also included the areas that you mentioned.

1. Addiction Psychiatry: Focuses on people of all ages who have addictions. Though most commonly it refers to drug or substance abuse, they also deal with people with other addictions to include but not limited to; food, gambling, or sex. This field also ties in closely with neuropsychology in that many addiction issues are connected to impulse control.

2. Geriatric Psychiatry: This is the psychiatry of old age. It is also known as geropsychiatry or psychogeriatrics. Old age is generally defined as those 65 years of age older. These types of psychiatrists evaluate, diagnose, and help older people with mental disorders that may have started later on in life.

3. Pediatric Psychiatry: This specialty is also known as Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. It focuses on the care of ages 4 up to 18. An interesting aspect of this branch of the psychiatry field is that it has more focus on prevention than just curing. It delves deeper into biological and social components that effect and cause child behaviors.

4. Neuropsychiatry: Studies how the brain functions and is stimulated and how these functions cause mental disturbances. The field can also come more specific in the study of Neurorehabilitation, which is the study of the brain's repair after injury or nervous system disorders.

5. Forensic Psychiatry: It is the combination of law or criminology and psychiatry. It is heavily science based. Forensic psychiatrists are unique in that they might spend some of their time actually evaluating legal cases. They may also design and implement treatment programs to be used by courts or correctional facilities. They even may work as special agents to the FBI.

6. Perinatal Psychiatry: Deals with women's mental health during and after pregnancy or the postpartum period. Depression and mood/anxiety disorders are commonly seen in pregnancy and may last up to a year afterward. They do not only treat mothers, but also support infant wellbeing and the relationship between parent and child.

7. Family Psychiatry: These types of psychiatrists treat individual problems as well as those that occur within a family unit. They show families how to support and care for a loved one who may be diagnosed with a mental illness. They perform a wide range of tasks to include evaluation, medication management, and therapy.

8. Research Psychiatry: Seeks to understand the true causes of mental illnesses. Also may tie in with neuropsychiatry. The goal of this field is to be able to take their studies and develop more efficient treatment procedures. Research psychiatry also lends itself to training other psychiatrists on advanced treatment outcomes.

9. Administrative Psychiatry: These types of psychiatrists usually work for a hospital or facility. Many of them work in the public sector or for Psychiatry residency programs. They have positions in leadership that may deal with a wide range of things from management to organizing clinical operations.

10. Organizational Psychiatry: This is a subspecialty of psychiatry that is also known as Industrial Psychiatry. It focuses on the mental of health of people in the workplace. It examines the relationship between stress and the work that people do. Their goal is to improve the quality of the workplace by examining organizational structure and suggesting or implementing changes as needed. Many Human Resource departments of major companies have an Organizational Psychiatrist on staff.

11. Emergency Psychiatry: Just as it sounds these are psychiatrists that work in emergency settings. They make work in the ER of a hospital. They deal with crisis related issues such suicide, violence, or other rapid changes in behavior. Many psychiatrists in the setting may also deal with patients going through drug withdrawal. They assess risks and make plans to keep patients safe.

Candice recommends the following next steps:

I am a Nationally Certified Psychiatric Technician Level 4. I currently work under the direction of 2 adult psychiatrists. One of them actually has a practice called The College Psychiatrist that specializes in the psychiatry of college students. Feel free to check out her website below. https://www.collegepsychiatrist.com/
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Trinidad’s Answer

Hello Trenity, this is a very great question. The sub-fields are specific concentrations in Psychiatry. Addiction focuses on specific addictions and understanding how those impact the mind. Pediatric focuses on kids when it comes to Psychiatry. While attending college, you will have the ability to find what field you want to study and there will be specific course you need to take that lean towards those sub-fields. I hope this helps!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kimberly’s Answer

The sub-fields or specializations you have listed are only a few of many . I would add Brain Injury, Forensic, psychosomatic medicine, learning disability (my specialty as a psychotherapist) Liaison Psychiatry (hospital based) social and community psychiatry, adult psychiatry, Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurology, Child Neurology, Pain Management Psychiatry, you get the idea. The options are almost unlimited.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

mark’s Answer

Hi Trenity,

I agree with the other responders that there are too many sub-fields to list and describe here. I recommend you think about the type of population you want to work with, the type of work environment you might like, the earning potential you are looking for, and what you think you need in order to feel pleased about what you choose to do. After narrowing things down, focus on the sub-fields you feel most closely fit your criteria and get on the path of researching fields extensively.

I hope this somewhat general answer will help. Check out my optional next steps below.

I hope you find what you are looking for.

Mark V.

mark recommends the following next steps:

Speak with professionals in some of the sub-fields you choose to pursue.
Take a variety of college courses so that your decisions can be made in a more informed way.
Talk with geaduate school students about the subjects you've identified.
Use the library and reliable internet resources often.
0