23 answers
Asked Viewed 311 times Translate

tips for undergrad student


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
19
100% of 17 Pros

23 answers


Updated Translate

John’s Answer

Chloe with college, there comes a new level of responsibility in terms of education. Students are confronted with classes that are often more challenging. In addition, the college campus itself is typically larger than life, with a diverse range of students and activities. During their freshman year, students may feel overwhelmed or stressed about these changes to their new life. Fortunately, there are ways for students to adjust successfully to college life.

STAY POSITIVE – Getting involved in college activities can help freshmen adjust to college life. Activities can help students feel as if they are a part of their environment, and help them to relieve some of the every day stress associated with classes and studying. Students may consider getting involved in clubs, sports, student organizations, or other activities that take place outside of the classroom. This will also allow them to meet and interact with new people on campus. Freshmen have a lot to adjust to and at times it can feel like too much to handle. When a student gets overwhelmed by meeting new people, adjusting to new professors, studying, and college life in general, he or she may start to feel negative about the whole experience. When this happens, it is crucial that students stay positive with both their behavior and thoughts. Associating with people who have a positive outlook on their college experience and avoiding those who do not are great ways to feel better. Thinking of long-term goals will also help students feel more positive about college and education in general.

BE CLASSY – Attending classes is one of the most important student responsibilities. With the new found freedom that college brings, some freshmen may feel tempted to skip classes for other activities. At certain colleges, attendance is critical, particularly for classes that are in high demand. Failure to attend may cause a student to be dropped from the class. In classes where attendance is not taken, students may miss critical information necessary for their studies and may fail the class. Unless a student is ill, he or she should make every effort to attend all of their classes in a timely manner. College is a source of many distractions for freshmen and new students. Meeting new people, social activities and the sense of independence that comes with being a college student may make it difficult to stay focused on education. Because the purpose of attending college is to obtain a degree, students must make every effort to stay focused on their studies. If extra-curricular activities hinder a student’s ability to focus, it may be necessary to make the decision to reduce those activities that hinder his or her ability to focus. When studying, environment may also wreak havoc on a student’s ability to focus.

GET PHYSICAL– During the first year in college, students may sleep less and eat foods that are less healthy than what they are accustomed to. Eating unhealthy food can cause students to gain weight and feel more tired. Studying, stress, or the excitement of social activities and events may cause students to lose sleep. It is important that freshmen make the effort to get a full night’s rest and to eat healthy meals for both their academic and physical health. Stress is an inevitable part of college life. New students must learn how to manage that stress so that it does not interfere with their education or affect their health. There are numerous approaches that students may take to do this successfully. Proper time management is one way to reduce stress and improve one’s studies. Eating and getting enough sleep will also help with stress management. Both physical activity and taking time for oneself can help promote relaxation and help students to unwind.

MAINTAIN HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS – New college students may feel uncomfortable when it comes to communicating their needs. This difficulty could arise when it comes to speaking with professors or with fellow students, such as roommates. No matter where the problem falls, it is necessary for freshman to develop the confidence and the skills to communicate effectively. Speaking with confidence and respect will help students to get the information that they need and help them to avoid confusion or complications with other students. During the first year of college, students will make many new friends. They may also have less contact with long-time friends and family. Maintaining a healthy relationship with both new and old friends is important. Students should keep in touch with friends even if they no longer live in the same city or state. When making new friendships, students should avoid people who may have a negative effect on their studies or their happiness and outlook in general. Honesty, communication and treating people with respect are important when it comes to forming and maintaining relationships.

Hi John, thank you so much for taking the time to reply to my question. I truly believe that it is so important to always remember your roots and maintain friendships back at home while building new ones. Thanks again! Chloe T.

Your Welcome Chloe, It was my Pleasure. Nothing is impossible, the word itself says “I’m possible”! John Frick

2
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Adrianna’s Answer

Personally, school can be extremely difficult for me. I am the type of person who has to study an extra 2-3 hrs for the same project that would take a normal student 1hr.
I worked hard is school, I got A's & B's and maybe a C or two.
I have a lot of friends that are geniuses in their field, who put all their time and efforts into getting their degree, and by the end of their degree had mentally fried themselves.
I suggest finding a good balance between social and academic. You can be brilliant, but if you stress yourself out on getting all A's your health and your grades will suffer.
One semester I had a descent work load where I spent every minute of everyday to get all the facts into my brain. By the end of that semester I was completely exhausted and so extremely frustrated with school that I didn't understand why I was pushing so hard. My grades were fine, not what I had wanted, and I realized I missed out on a lot of social opportunities that would fill my memory instead of my GPA. After that semester I tried things differently.

I studied abroad for a semester which absolutely changed my life and opened my eyes to many other opportunities. I took advantage of social opportunities while still studying hard. SOMETIMES I even got to be social and study at the same time through study groups were a god send at helping me understand information and make strong connections.

The only thing i regret was not taking more advantage of school ran events.

Hi Adrianna, thank you so much for replying. I totally resonate with your post because I am that person who has to study two times harder and longer than anyone else and sometimes still doesn't end up getting the grades I want which can be very discouraging. I really hope to study abroad for a semester! Where did you go to study abroad? Chloe T.

I went to Australia! I am a Zoology major so there weren't a whole lot of options for me unless I wanted to take more classes outside of my major. It was a lot of work to go through to get everything finalized and accepted through my school, but it was so worth it. I highly recommend and start as soon as you can so hopefully you'll have more options! Adrianna Chabot

That sounds amazing! I would love to go on an exchange but I am not sure when I will be able to due to COVID unfortunately Chloe T.

Thats very true... what year are you in? I only had about 2 semesters left when I went (which was literally the latest I could have gone), this whole ordeal can't last forever...right? Adrianna Chabot

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Sydney’s Answer

Hello! As a current undergrad student I'll tell you what I've done to ensure my college life is as great as possible as well as most educational.
1. At my school, I joined a honors college that helped allow me get priority in picking my classes which means I could do a ton of research on all the professors and look into their teaching styles to see what would be most compatible with mine.
2. I went to a TON of office hours. I know too many students who average out a A-/B average mainly because they didn't seek the help they needed by their professor. So I would always stop by my professors office hours whether that be asking questions about the homework (as most of my classes assign homework but do not grade) or just checking in about random topics. By doing things you're also creating a good bond with your professor so it becomes easier to ask them for help or maybe a handy letter of recommendation or maybe you'll want a TA job soon!
3. Make friends :) I think having a good small knit group of friends who you feel really close to in your college years are good. They can help you form study groups, work on projects together or help you get through a rough professor. Being an undergrad isn't all about work.
4. Know what your major is, and stick to it! All majors will have some sort of road block! Be sure that you're aware of these struggles and am to get past them.
5. In general, just some weird wisdom for you. In order to be happy later, you have to be happy now. Things won't magically just work out and be happy, you have to chose to do what's best and happiest for you in the moment now so you can be happy later.

Hi Sydney, thank you so much for sharing! I definitely will take advantage of office hours and just forming a really good relationship with my professors. Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Chris’s Answer

There are so many great answers to this question already. I think I am just going to be summarizing with my answer.

1. Never leave your home work for the last minute. Getting started early prevents stress.
2. Do get involved! Join associations on campus. These are the people you want to mingle with.
3. Don't work if you don't have to. If you do, keep it to 20 hours or less.
4. Do look for scholarships! (if you need them)
5. Do get A's. A few B's won't hurt.
6. Remember to take a breathe, and have fun too.

The absolute #1 thing I wish I did my first year of college was live in a dorm. I didn't. I thought I could have an apartment and be ok. I was detached , and failed miserably. I was able to pick myself up and get mostly A's the next 3 years.

Hi Christ, thank you so much for replying. These are all really useful tips take care Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Krasti’s Answer

Hi Chloe,
I would recommend balancing your academic, social, and personal life. Academics can get very overwhelming if you procrastinate and pile it up until the last minute. It was something I was too familiar with when I was attending school, but wished I learned how to do better. If academic help is needed, take advantage of office hours with the professor/TA. They are a big resource and can benefit you in the long run. Also take advantage of extracurricular activities and get involved in leadership positions. This will help grow your resume and make you look like a strong candidate for potential job opportunities. Good luck!

Hi Krasti, Thank you so much for your advise. I regret not taking advantage of the TA and office hours...will definitely improve on that next year! Take Care! Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Carina’s Answer

Some things I wish I'd known entering undergrad:

Get involved early on but not with too many clubs. Pick a few things that you're interested in and really invest yourself in it.

Get to know professors early on. Go to office hours even if you don't have a specific question.

Don't be afraid to ask for help. There will be a lot of really smart people at college, but that doesn't make you any less intelligent. Don't be afraid of getting something wrong.

Good luck!

Hi Carina, thank you! I agree, in college, it is easy to compare yourself to others, but it is a good reminder that everyone is doing different things and working towards their own goals, making us equal! Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Farshad’s Answer

I wish I thought more deeply about what I wanted to do in life and how I envisioned impacting society. Most individuals go to undergrad because societal and family pressures. Even more often, students graduate high-school and default into undergraduate school as a substitute for thinking about the future. For most students, undergrad is a 4 year party and an MBA is a 2 year vacation.

If I can go back in time, I would think much more deeply about the future and connect myself to individuals who have the similar curiosity and passion about the future.

Farshad recommends the following next steps:

Think deeply about the future

Hi Farshad, thank you so much for your advice! I appreciate it, wish you all the best. Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Chris’s Answer

There are so many great answers to this question already. I think I am just going to be summarizing with my answer.

1. Never leave your home work for the last minute. Getting started early prevents stress.
2. Do get involved! Join associations on campus. These are the people you want to mingle with.
3. Don't work if you don't have to. If you do, keep it to 20 hours or less.
4. Do look for scholarships! (if you need them)
5. Do get A's. A few B's won't hurt.
6. Remember to take a breathe, and have fun too.

The absolute #1 thing I wish I did my first year of college was live in a dorm. I didn't. I thought I could have an apartment and be ok. I was detached , and failed miserably. I was able to pick myself up and get mostly A's the next 3 years.

0
Updated Translate

Fatima’s Answer

Always try you hardest to get a high GPA every semester. It’s easier to build up from a good GPA then try rebuild your GPA. GPA is another factor when applying for internships

Hi Fatima, thank you! I didn't get a high GPA in the first semester and even though it was very discouraging, I will definitely try harder the next semester. Thanks a lot and take care Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Abbie’s Answer

I feel like it is important to make sure that you are allowing yourself to have new experiences and interact with different people by putting yourself into situations that you might not normally be in or clubs you might not normally join. Often time these are times where you can experience the most personal growth.

Hi Abbie, you are so right. It is so easy to stay in your own comfort zone and not try new things. I will definitely try to join clubs that I don't normally join. Thank you and take care! Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Allison’s Answer

Maintain a routine that helps you successfully get work done, socialize, and plan your future! Get involved! Find out your true passions, and network with others so that you can learn more about different options out there. If you make an effort to pursue your dreams, others will see that and will be happy to help you reach your goals!

0
Updated Translate

Akshar’s Answer

One thing that I wish to re-do is in addition to focusing on what I am majoring in, I probably should have looked at other fields as well.

Thank you so much! Yes, i agree it is important to be open-minded to new opportunities. Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Edward Obasi’s Answer

Focusing on grades and GPA is important, but remember to enjoy the journey. I waited until Spring Quarter of senior year to take time for self care and enjoy myself, then COVID-19 happened. In summary, remember to take your academics seriously, but take time for self care as well.

Hi Edward, thank you so much for replying! It is so easy to get caught up with work and neglect self-care and social life. I did the same thing in Freshman year, I was too invested and in getting the grades I want...hopefully I will have a more balanced lifestyle in my sophomore year. Thank you and take care! Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Allison’s Answer

Maintain a routine that helps you successfully get work done, socialize, and plan your future! Get involved! Find out your true passions, and network with others so that you can learn more about different options out there. If you make an effort to pursue your dreams, others will see that and will be happy to help you reach your goals!

Hi Allison, this is great advice! How did you find your true passion? Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Adebola’s Answer

One thing I wish I did was network with my peers and other professionals during my freshman year. Definitely take advantage of the resources that your school offers!

0
Updated Translate

Julie’s Answer

That is a wise question for you to be asking now, as part of planning for what you want in your own personal undergraduate experience. I chose a different path by working full-time and going to school in the evenings or weekends. However, I can look back at that experience like anyone else and my advise would be to seek guidance early on with a class that you find yourself really struggling with. Try not to feel like you have to go it alone and 'tough it out'. Seek a trustworthy study partner or small group, schedule time with the teacher or instructor to get tips or suggestion on tutoring, check with someone else in the Department, etc. I would think all of this could be achieved virtually as well.

0
Updated Translate

Richard’s Answer

Go to class. Plan to spend 2-3 hours studying for every hour of lecture. Attend your professor's office hours and any TA review sessions. If there is a test bank, use that as a study tool to understand what your professor wants you to focus on for the test.

Thank you so much Richard! appreciate it Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Mike’s Answer

Chloe,

Advice in bullet points:

* Join campus organizations (this helps expand your network)
* Study the humanities (Great literature protects you from propaganda)
* Make friends and go to sporting events (Network)
* Build relationships with professors

God Bless!

0
Updated Translate

Shara’s Answer

I was able to get a small editorial assistant internship that counted toward part of one of my classes, and it was a great opportunity because I was able to coordinate between what I learned as part of the internship and what I was learning in class. You can also ask to extend your internship into a part time job depending on the company and what you're looking to do next.

0
Updated Translate

Shara’s Answer

I was able to get a small editorial assistant internship that counted toward part of one of my classes, and it was a great opportunity because I was able to coordinate between what I learned as part of the internship and what I was learning in class. You can also ask to extend your internship into a part time job depending on the company and what you're looking to do next.

0
Updated Translate

Julie’s Answer

That is a wise question for you to be asking now, as part of planning for what you want in your own personal undergraduate experience. I chose a different path by working full-time and going to school in the evenings or weekends. However, I can look back at that experience like anyone else and my advise would be to seek guidance early on with a class that you find yourself really struggling with. Try not to feel like you have to go it alone and 'tough it out'. Seek a trustworthy study partner or small group, schedule time with the teacher or instructor to get tips or suggestion on tutoring, check with someone else in the Department, etc. I would think all of this could be achieved virtually as well.

Hi Julie, thank you so much for the advice! I will definitely seek opportunities to get more guidance! Chloe T.

0
Updated Translate

Shara’s Answer

I was able to get a small editorial assistant internship that counted toward part of one of my classes, and it was a great opportunity because I was able to coordinate between what I learned as part of the internship and what I was learning in class. You can also ask to extend your internship into a part time job depending on the company and what you're looking to do next.

0
Updated Translate

Carolyn’s Answer

Chloe,

The best advice I could give you is to take it seriously and don’t come in with the expectations that it is going to be easy. I had a high GPA in high school and school was never difficult for me so I just assumed college would be the same. It is a way different ball game and my first semester was rough.
Another piece of advice is to get involved! I know you might roll your eyes during orientation when every speaker says this but it couldn’t be more true. I got involved in my junior and senior year and I got a job opportunity out of it and now because of that job, I am in FEMAcorps hoping to get a job with FEMA after the program.
Another important thing is to keep an open mind. You might know what you want to do for a career when you start your undergrad but just keep your eyes open for other opportunities and you might find a career path that you didn’t know about. If there is an opportunity that you are interested in, do it. You never know where it will lead you. I majored in Psychology for my undergrad with the plan to become a psychologist. When I was a junior I was presented with an opportunity to go to North Carolina and later Puerto Rico for a service project for disaster relief in those areas and I ended up loving emergency management and am now pursuing a career in it. So just keep an open mind and don’t be afraid to try new things.
My last piece of advice is to stay positive and motivated. Like I said, college is hard but it’s not impossible. Strive to be great and not average and get to know your professors. This is important because your professors have a wealth of knowledge that they want to share with you and if you have a good relationship with them you can use them as references for a job in the future. Just stay positive and know that you got this!

Hi Carolyn, Thank you so much for replying. Your post really resonates with me because I am also a psych major and my freshman year's grades did not look good. But I will definitely try harder next semester. I wish you all the best! Chloe T.

0