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How to narrow down a cluster of different career paths and interests, to about 3 or 4 and focus on those few, without uncertainty and second guessing?

The majors I am interested in are so different from each other (ex: architecture and law) that I am having a hard time to narrow it down to just a few.
I am aware that I don't have to know now but I am on a time crunch and my goal is to narrow it down to 2 and stick with it.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Megan’s Answer

Here's a small exercise that may help you:

Megan recommends the following next steps:

Write down all interested career paths
Find similar themes and group them together
Create notes in Venn Diagrams or SWOT Analysis to see which you prefer
See if there's overlap and you can double-major, pursue additional professional degrees, and/or target working in a specific type of industry
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Priscilla’s Answer

I've been in multiple roles in my life (I'm in by 40s now). I started in IT, then HR, and now I work as Product Manager in a Financial institution (I graduated from Business Administrator, which is an amazing way to keep your options open - HR, Marketing, Finance, etc).
People change as they progress in life. Something that motivates and interest you may not be the same 20 years from now. So I would say keep your mind and your eyes open. Don't get too worried about having to choose one career and thinking that you need to stick with that. As long as you're growing (more senior positions, compensation, or personal achievement), you're good.
I agree with the other responses, that a intersectional job may be very interesting.
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Baljit’s Answer

Hi Carl,
Have you looked into double major? Maybe you can start be researching the areas that you are interested in. You would also have to talk to the advisors or admissions at the school that you want to attend. Double majors a little more difficult in the amount of work you have to do but its definitely worth it if you have more than one interest in learning and working in.
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Kim’s Answer

I would look for the "intersection" of two careers. . . for example, law and medicine, could lead you to medical malpractice law. Cooking/History/Acting could lead to doing Historical Reenactments! Of course, you eventually have to decide which one is the main major, and perhaps, which is the second major/or minor. But start out pursuing two or three, along with your general ed requirements. Try to get involved in related student or community activities, to see where you feel like you "fit in." It's hard looking at it from the outside and trying to guess!

While none of us want to waste money on classes that won't apply to our degrees, PLEASE change majors if you realize you made the wrong choice! Don't stick with something that's just not "you!"
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Lennox’s Answer

Your career can (and likely will) evolve over time after you graduate.

I recommend learning how to do something called an 'informational interview'. Reach out to people who are in the professions that you're considering and ask them about their day to day work. I've ruled out a lot of career paths by learning more about what people *actually* do in their jobs. With curiosity and respect, you can learn a lot. This is a good way to start networking, and maybe even to land an internship.

Your major matters, but it does not dictate your career. You can go to law school with a music degree, and you can be a doctor with a pre-law degree. My biggest caution... I've seen people start with 3 majors and then never finish any! Finishing any degree is better than starting 3 and finishing none. Additionally, you might considering that an architecture firm employs many more people than just an architect, and a law firm employs more than just lawyers; Paralegals, project managers, consultants, data scientists, and more are there to support the firm's goals.
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Mustabsheera’s Answer

Hi Carl!
Hope you are doing well.

Cost-benefit Analysis is the best way to find out the right career path. As I was confused about two fields when I was in Grade 12 so I created a list of the Advantages and Disadvantages of that profession (MBBS and Bs Psychology) and It really helps me to figure out the right career path.

Today, I am an Associate Psychologist and Behavior therapist and I am so happy with this profession.

Thank you comment icon Thanks for your response, I never thought of that! Carl-Hanee
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