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What are some extracurriculars I could do that is stem/medicine based?

I’ve had a lot of ideas on what Extracurriculars I want to do but they just seem too much for me to accomplish as a 16 year old. Some ideas I had was formulating an eco friendly sunscreen using chemistry principals but I would assume you need to have a degree in chemistry. Another idea was creating a skin cancer detecting app, or starting a program by going around to different schools, and/or community centers providing information on skin cancer and hosting events with the help of volunteers from my school. Honestly this all just seems really complicated for me to do especially without a mentor. I plan to start volunteering at a kidney center next month and get a part time job on the weekends. At the moment I am applying to stem/medicine based internships. I need some advice.

I am 16 and in 10th grade. I plan to major in chemistry and I aspire to be a dermatologist.

+25 Karma if successful
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Subject: Career question for you

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Aisha,

It's fantastic to know you're passionate about STEM and medicine, with clear objectives in sight. As a 10th grader, you have ample time to explore your passions and hone your abilities. Here are some engaging extracurricular activities you might find interesting:

Science Olympiad: This is a contest where you can display your scientific knowledge in different areas like chemistry and biology. You can team up with your schoolmates and participate in local and national competitions. It's an excellent platform to apply classroom learning to practical situations.

Medical Club: Many high schools host medical clubs that offer students the chance to learn about the medical profession, engage in community service projects, and listen to guest speakers from the healthcare industry. It can give you a clearer idea about the medical profession and what you might want to study in college.

Research Assistant: If your school or local colleges provide research opportunities for high school students, consider becoming a research assistant. This role will give you practical experience in conducting a research project, which can be beneficial if you're planning to major in chemistry or pursue a research career.

Science Fair: Participating in a science fair is an excellent way to exhibit your creativity and problem-solving abilities. You can create an experiment or project related to chemistry or skin cancer detection. This can also help you improve your presentation and communication skills, which will be beneficial for your college applications and future dermatology career.

Coding Club: If you're interested in developing a skin cancer detection app or other tech-based projects, learning to code can be beneficial. Joining a coding club or taking coding classes can help you acquire these skills.

Community Service: Volunteering at a kidney center is a wonderful way to contribute to your community and gain experience in a healthcare environment. You might also consider volunteering at other healthcare facilities, such as hospitals or clinics, or engaging in health-related community service projects through your school or other organizations.

Internships: Applying for internships in STEM or medicine is a fantastic idea! Internships can offer valuable work experience, help you build professional skills, and provide insights into potential career paths.

Online Courses: Numerous online courses cover STEM and medicine-related topics. Enrolling in an online course can deepen your understanding of these subjects and prepare you for college-level studies.

As for your ideas about developing an eco-friendly sunscreen or a skin cancer detection app, you can undertake these projects without a degree in chemistry or computer science. However, remember that these projects may need substantial time and resources. It's important to start early and seek advice from mentors or professionals in the field. If these projects seem too complex or time-consuming at the moment, it's perfectly fine to begin with smaller projects or activities that align with your interests and goals. Remember, every experience contributes to building your skills and knowledge!

From where I stand as a chemist, nutritionist, and dietitian there are some fat-soluble vitamins that are exemplary occurrences in nature. There are the eight natural isomers of vitamin E! Why 8?

dextro-alpha, beta, gamma, and delta tocopherol; and dextro-alpha, beta, gamma, and delta tocotrienol. These would be an excellent addition to a natural cosmetic.

Stay blessed!
James Constantine.
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angie’s Answer

Hello, Aisha,

I love this question and the time you took to ask, but I don't know, so I figured I'd ask ChatGPT for you. Below is what it said. I hope it helps, and good luck! You already seem to have the capability to do this!!! ~ Angie

It's great to see your enthusiasm for STEM and medicine! While your ideas are ambitious, there are plenty of extracurricular activities you can pursue that align with your interests and are achievable at your age. Here are some suggestions:

1. Science or Math Competitions:
Participate in science fairs, math competitions, or STEM-related academic competitions. This can help you develop research, problem-solving, and presentation skills.
Look for local, regional, or national competitions such as the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), Science Olympiad, or MathCounts.

2. Science Clubs and Organizations:
Join or start a science club at your school focused on chemistry, biology, or other STEM fields.
Participate in extracurricular science programs offered by museums, science centers, or community organizations.

3. Science Research:
Seek out research opportunities through local universities, hospitals, or research institutions. Many offer summer programs or internships for high school students interested in STEM fields.
Reach out to professors or researchers in chemistry or dermatology departments to inquire about potential research assistant positions or shadowing opportunities.

4. Volunteering in Healthcare Settings:
In addition to your planned volunteer work at the kidney center, consider volunteering at hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes. This can provide valuable exposure to the healthcare field and patient care experience.
Look for volunteering opportunities specifically related to dermatology or skin health education, such as volunteering at skin cancer awareness events or health fairs.

5. STEM Clubs and Activities:
Participate in STEM-related clubs and activities at your school, such as robotics club, coding club, or math team.
Look for STEM-focused workshops, camps, or seminars offered in your community or online.

6. Online Courses and Projects:
Take advantage of online resources and courses to further your knowledge in chemistry, biology, or computer science. Websites like Coursera, Khan Academy, and edX offer free or low-cost courses on a wide range of STEM topics.
Consider working on smaller-scale STEM projects or experiments at home, such as conducting chemistry experiments or building simple electronics projects.

7. Leadership and Outreach:
Get involved in leadership roles within your school or community, such as organizing STEM-related events or fundraisers.
Consider starting a STEM outreach program or club aimed at educating younger students about STEM fields and careers.

8. Networking and Mentorship:
Reach out to professionals in the fields of chemistry and dermatology to inquire about mentorship opportunities or informational interviews. Many professionals are willing to provide guidance and advice to aspiring students.
Join online communities or forums related to STEM and medicine to connect with other students and professionals who share your interests.

While your long-term goals may seem daunting right now, focusing on these achievable extracurricular activities can help you build a strong foundation of skills, experiences, and connections that will benefit you as you pursue your aspirations in chemistry and dermatology. Remember to stay curious, proactive, and open to new opportunities along the way!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Angie! Aisha
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Connor’s Answer

Hi Aisha,

I love your determination and ideas. You don't need any sort of qualification to start your own business. It just takes time and effort to find out the things that you need to know in order to carry out what you want to do. Sometimes this involved college, sometimes you can find everything you need to know from the internet, people and experience trying. I would encourage you to seek a mentor for any of these if you can, it may be difficult to find someone but odds are there is someone who is passionate about skin health just like you, a good place to start would be dermatologists or companies that do this kind of work around lotions or derma-products.

Volunteer work in hospitals and clinics is a great idea. Additionally, you can try to find a job where you can be a medical scribe. Other extracurriculars could be shadowing and interviewing professionals such as chemistry professors or dermatologists. It never hurts to find some contact information and send an email.


Goodluck!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate it, thank you! Aisha
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Karin’s Answer

Hi Aisha,

I think the idea to educate about skin cancer is really cool and doable.

I left some links for more internship options for you below.

I hope this helps! Good luck!

KP

Karin recommends the following next steps:

https://www.seattlechildrens.org/research/centers-programs/science-education-department/high-school-training-programs/
https://www.fredhutch.org/en/education-training/high-school-students/summer-high-school-internship-program.html
https://equity.uwmedicine.org/home/high-school-college/
https://neurosurgery.uw.edu/education/summer-student-programs
https://dental.washington.edu/oepd/youth-programs/
Thank you comment icon Karin, thank you! Aisha
Thank you comment icon You are very welcome! Karin P.
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Martin’s Answer

Your question is fantastic and quite expansive! The area where you can volunteer varies greatly depending on where you live. You might find opportunities in hospitals or nursing homes, within your local community, in research, and beyond - the possibilities are endless! It's all about discovering what's out there for yourself. Try to connect with someone who works in a field you're interested in. I can share from my own experience that during my college years, I had the privilege to spend a semester, unpaid, shadowing one of the leading pediatric heart surgeons. Not only did I observe him, but I also occasionally helped his residents in the labs. It was a fun and enlightening experience!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Martin! Aisha
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